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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The national implementation of 'Proactive Health Support' in Denmark since 2017: Expectations and challenges for the telephone-based self-management program

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    Research output: Contribution to journalContribution to newspaper - Feature articleCommunication

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In Denmark, as in many other Western countries, a small group of people are major hospital users and account for a large proportion of health care spending. Proactive Health Support (PaHS) is the first national Danish program that aims to reduce health care consumption targeting people at risk of becoming major users of health services. PaHS was part of the government's The sooner-the better national health policy, which includes a focus on policy programs targeting the weakest and most complex chronic patients at risk of high health care consumption. PaHS is a telephone-based self-management support program that uses a prediction model to identify people at high risk of acute hospital admissions. Reducing preventable hospital admissions and enhancing quality of life are central policy goals. The Danish policy was inspired by a Swedish policy program, and PaHS has been implemented based on policy transfer with political expectations that the Swedish results can be replicated in Denmark. The effects of PaHS are currently under study, and time will show whether expectations can be met. This paper discusses institutional conditions and expectations related to replicating a policy program and its outcomes. In addition, it highlights implementation issues that may affect the success of the policy program.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth policy (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Volume124
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)674-678
Number of pages5
ISSN0168-8510
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

ID: 60005654