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The National Early Warning Score predicts mortality in hospital ward patients with deviating vital signs: A retrospective medical record review study

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  1. Implementing mandatory early warning scoring impacts nurses' practice of documenting free text notes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if the scale used for assessment of hospital ward patients could predict in-hospital and 30-day mortality amongst those with deviating vital signs i.e. that patients classified as medium or high-risk would have increased risk of in-hospital and 30-day mortality compared to patients with low-risk.

BACKGROUND: The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) is a widely-adopted scale for assessing deviating vital signs. A clinical risk-scale that comes with the NEWS divides the risk for critical illness into three risk-categories, low, medium and high.

DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of vital signs data.

METHODS: Logistic regression models for age-adjusted in-hospital and 30-day mortality were used for analyses of 1107 patients with deviating vital signs.

RESULTS: Patients classified as medium or high-risk by NEWS experienced a 2,11 or 3,40 increase, respectively, in odds of in-hospital death (95% CI: 1,27-3,51, p=0.004 & 95% CI: 1,90-6,01, p<0.001) compared to low-risk patients. Moreover, those with NEWS medium or high-risk were associated with a 1,98 or 3,19 increase, respectively, in odds of 30-day mortality (95% CI: 1,32-2,97, p=0.001 & 95% CI: 1,97-5,18, p<0.001).

CONCLUSION: The NEWS risk classification seems to be a reliable predictor of mortality on patients in hospital wards.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The NEWS risk classification offers a simple way to identify deteriorating patients and can aid the healthcare staff to prioritize among patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume28
Issue number7-8
Pages (from-to)1216-1222
Number of pages7
ISSN0962-1067
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Bibliographical note

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Research areas

  • Early Warning Score, Medical Emergency Team, National Early Warning Score, critical care, critical care outreach, hospital mortality, in-hospital cardiac arrest, vital signs, Prospective Studies, Hospital Mortality, Risk Assessment, Humans, Middle Aged, Decision Support Techniques, Logistic Models, Male, Critical Illness/classification, Clinical Deterioration, Vital Signs/physiology, Adult, Female, Aged, Retrospective Studies

ID: 55767138