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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The in vivo biofilm

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  1. Antimicrobial Tolerance and Metabolic Adaptations in Microbial Biofilms

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  2. Comparative analysis of the molecular mechanisms of recombination in hepatitis C virus

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  3. Interactions in multispecies biofilms: do they actually matter?

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  1. The efficacy of topical agents used in wounds for managing chronic biofilm infections: A systematic review

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  2. Biofilms of Mycobacterium abscessus complex can be sensitized to antibiotics by disaggregation and oxygenation

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  3. Minimum information guideline for spectrofotometric and fluorometric methods to assess biofilm formation in microplates

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  4. Primary ciliary dyskinesia patients have the same P. aeruginosa clone in sinuses and lungs

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  5. Is pseudarthrosis after spinal instrumentation caused by a chronic infection?

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Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms, and we suggest new strategies for improving this discrepancy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Microbiology
Volume21
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)466-74
Number of pages9
ISSN0966-842X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

ID: 42453903