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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The impact of blood type on transfusion after major emergency abdominal surgery

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BACKGROUND: ABO dependent variation in von Willebrand factor (vWF) and factor VIII have an impact on hemostasis. Several contradictory studies have investigated the influence of ABO blood type in surgical hemorrhage. Emergency surgery is associated with an increased risk of perioperative hemorrhage leading to inferior clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate if patients with blood type O received more transfusions with blood components compared with non-O patients after major emergency abdominal surgery.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This retrospective observational study combined perioperative data including hemoglobin with transfusion data in patients undergoing emergency surgery at a university hospital between January 2010 and October 2016. The primary outcome was postoperative transfusion stratified into early transfusion, within 24 hours after surgery, and late transfusion from 24 hours to 7 days (POD7) after surgery.

RESULTS: A total of 869 patients were included, 363 patients with blood type O (42.0%) and 501 (58.0%) with blood type non-O. We found no difference in the need for transfusion with 42 (11.6%) patients with blood type O and 66 (13.2%) patients with blood type non-O receiving early transfusion and 39 (13.4%) and 48 (11.9%) of O and non-O patients, respectively, receiving late transfusion. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed an adjusted OR of 0.915 (95% CI 0.569-1.471) for early transfusion and an adjusted OR of 1.307 (95% CI 0.788-2.169) for late transfusion in patients with blood type O. Likewise, no difference was seen with respect to the change in hemoglobin levels before and after surgery as well as transfused volume.

CONCLUSION: We did not find an association between transfusion or perioperative changes in hemoglobin with respect to blood type ABO.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTransfusion
Volume59
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
ISSN0041-1132
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

ID: 56119546