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The effects of weight loss on imaging outcomes in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese: a systematic review

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@article{921fa81609254f7e9453ebcafe73fe47,
title = "The effects of weight loss on imaging outcomes in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese: a systematic review",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the structural effects of weight loss on hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to summarize which structural joint pathologies have been examined and the evidence for the outcome measurement instruments applied.DESIGN: Based on a pre-specified protocol (available: PROSPERO CRD42017065263), we conducted a systematic search of the bibliographic databases, Medline, Embase and Web of Science identifying longitudinal articles reporting the effects of weight loss on structural imaging outcomes in OA of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese.RESULTS: From 1625 potentially eligible records, 14 articles (from 6 cohorts) were included. 2 cohorts were derived from RCTs. Evaluated pathologies were: articular cartilage (n = 7), joint space width (n = 3), bone marrow lesions (n = 5), synovitis (n = 2), effusion (n = 1), meniscus (n = 3), bone marrow density (n = 1) and infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP; n = 2). Cartilage showed conflicting results when evaluating cartilage thickness by direct thickness measurements. Compositional dGEMRIC and T2 mapping measures in early knee OA showed trends towards reduced cartilage degeneration. Joint space width on conventional radiographs showed no change. Weight loss reduced the size of the IPFP. Synovitis and effusion were not affected. Following weight loss DXA showed bone loss at the hip.CONCLUSION: We did not find consistent evidence of the effects of weight loss on OA structural pathology in people who are overweight or obese. There is a need to achieve consensus on which structural pathologies and measurements to apply in weight loss and OA research.",
author = "Daugaard, {C L} and S Hangaard and Bartels, {E M} and H Gudbergsen and R Christensen and H Bliddal and M Englund and Conaghan, {P G} and M Boesen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.joca.2019.10.013",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "10--21",
journal = "Osteoarthritis and Cartilage",
issn = "1063-4584",
publisher = "W.B./Saunders Co. Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of weight loss on imaging outcomes in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Daugaard, C L

AU - Hangaard, S

AU - Bartels, E M

AU - Gudbergsen, H

AU - Christensen, R

AU - Bliddal, H

AU - Englund, M

AU - Conaghan, P G

AU - Boesen, M

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the structural effects of weight loss on hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to summarize which structural joint pathologies have been examined and the evidence for the outcome measurement instruments applied.DESIGN: Based on a pre-specified protocol (available: PROSPERO CRD42017065263), we conducted a systematic search of the bibliographic databases, Medline, Embase and Web of Science identifying longitudinal articles reporting the effects of weight loss on structural imaging outcomes in OA of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese.RESULTS: From 1625 potentially eligible records, 14 articles (from 6 cohorts) were included. 2 cohorts were derived from RCTs. Evaluated pathologies were: articular cartilage (n = 7), joint space width (n = 3), bone marrow lesions (n = 5), synovitis (n = 2), effusion (n = 1), meniscus (n = 3), bone marrow density (n = 1) and infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP; n = 2). Cartilage showed conflicting results when evaluating cartilage thickness by direct thickness measurements. Compositional dGEMRIC and T2 mapping measures in early knee OA showed trends towards reduced cartilage degeneration. Joint space width on conventional radiographs showed no change. Weight loss reduced the size of the IPFP. Synovitis and effusion were not affected. Following weight loss DXA showed bone loss at the hip.CONCLUSION: We did not find consistent evidence of the effects of weight loss on OA structural pathology in people who are overweight or obese. There is a need to achieve consensus on which structural pathologies and measurements to apply in weight loss and OA research.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the structural effects of weight loss on hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to summarize which structural joint pathologies have been examined and the evidence for the outcome measurement instruments applied.DESIGN: Based on a pre-specified protocol (available: PROSPERO CRD42017065263), we conducted a systematic search of the bibliographic databases, Medline, Embase and Web of Science identifying longitudinal articles reporting the effects of weight loss on structural imaging outcomes in OA of the hip or knee in people who are overweight or obese.RESULTS: From 1625 potentially eligible records, 14 articles (from 6 cohorts) were included. 2 cohorts were derived from RCTs. Evaluated pathologies were: articular cartilage (n = 7), joint space width (n = 3), bone marrow lesions (n = 5), synovitis (n = 2), effusion (n = 1), meniscus (n = 3), bone marrow density (n = 1) and infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP; n = 2). Cartilage showed conflicting results when evaluating cartilage thickness by direct thickness measurements. Compositional dGEMRIC and T2 mapping measures in early knee OA showed trends towards reduced cartilage degeneration. Joint space width on conventional radiographs showed no change. Weight loss reduced the size of the IPFP. Synovitis and effusion were not affected. Following weight loss DXA showed bone loss at the hip.CONCLUSION: We did not find consistent evidence of the effects of weight loss on OA structural pathology in people who are overweight or obese. There is a need to achieve consensus on which structural pathologies and measurements to apply in weight loss and OA research.

U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2019.10.013

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2019.10.013

M3 - Review

VL - 28

SP - 10

EP - 21

JO - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

JF - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

SN - 1063-4584

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 58860712