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The chronobiology of migraine: a systematic review

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@article{7697e3964fea4380a3c9329e279def13,
title = "The chronobiology of migraine: a systematic review",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The paroxysmal nature of migraine is a hallmark of the disease. Some patients report increased attack frequency at certain seasons or towards the end of the week, while others experience diurnal variations of migraine attack onset. This systematic review investigates the chronobiology of migraine and its relation to the periodicity of attacks in existing literature to further understand the oscillating nature of migraine.MAIN BODY: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched and screened for eligible articles with outcome measures relating to a circadian, weekly or seasonal distribution of migraine attacks. We found that the majority of studies reported morning hours (6 am-12 pm) as the peak time of onset for migraine attacks. More studies reported Saturday as weekly peak day of attack. There was no clear seasonal variation of migraine due to methodological differences (primarily related to location), however four out of five studies conducted in Norway reported the same yearly peak time indicating a possible seasonal periodicity phenomenon of migraine.CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current review suggest a possible role of chronobiologic rhythms to the periodicity of migraine attacks. Future studies are, however, still needed to provide more knowledge of the oscillating nature of migraine.",
keywords = "Circadian Rhythm, Humans, Migraine Disorders, Norway, Seasons, circadian, chronobiology, seasonal, Migraine, periodicity, weekly",
author = "Poulsen, {Amanda Holmen} and Samaira Younis and Janu Thuraiaiyah and Messoud Ashina",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021. The Author(s).",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1186/s10194-021-01276-w",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "The Journal of Headache and Pain Online",
issn = "1129-2377",
publisher = "SpringerOpen",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The chronobiology of migraine

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Poulsen, Amanda Holmen

AU - Younis, Samaira

AU - Thuraiaiyah, Janu

AU - Ashina, Messoud

N1 - © 2021. The Author(s).

PY - 2021/12

Y1 - 2021/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: The paroxysmal nature of migraine is a hallmark of the disease. Some patients report increased attack frequency at certain seasons or towards the end of the week, while others experience diurnal variations of migraine attack onset. This systematic review investigates the chronobiology of migraine and its relation to the periodicity of attacks in existing literature to further understand the oscillating nature of migraine.MAIN BODY: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched and screened for eligible articles with outcome measures relating to a circadian, weekly or seasonal distribution of migraine attacks. We found that the majority of studies reported morning hours (6 am-12 pm) as the peak time of onset for migraine attacks. More studies reported Saturday as weekly peak day of attack. There was no clear seasonal variation of migraine due to methodological differences (primarily related to location), however four out of five studies conducted in Norway reported the same yearly peak time indicating a possible seasonal periodicity phenomenon of migraine.CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current review suggest a possible role of chronobiologic rhythms to the periodicity of migraine attacks. Future studies are, however, still needed to provide more knowledge of the oscillating nature of migraine.

AB - BACKGROUND: The paroxysmal nature of migraine is a hallmark of the disease. Some patients report increased attack frequency at certain seasons or towards the end of the week, while others experience diurnal variations of migraine attack onset. This systematic review investigates the chronobiology of migraine and its relation to the periodicity of attacks in existing literature to further understand the oscillating nature of migraine.MAIN BODY: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched and screened for eligible articles with outcome measures relating to a circadian, weekly or seasonal distribution of migraine attacks. We found that the majority of studies reported morning hours (6 am-12 pm) as the peak time of onset for migraine attacks. More studies reported Saturday as weekly peak day of attack. There was no clear seasonal variation of migraine due to methodological differences (primarily related to location), however four out of five studies conducted in Norway reported the same yearly peak time indicating a possible seasonal periodicity phenomenon of migraine.CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current review suggest a possible role of chronobiologic rhythms to the periodicity of migraine attacks. Future studies are, however, still needed to provide more knowledge of the oscillating nature of migraine.

KW - Circadian Rhythm

KW - Humans

KW - Migraine Disorders

KW - Norway

KW - Seasons

KW - circadian

KW - chronobiology

KW - seasonal

KW - Migraine

KW - periodicity

KW - weekly

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111869610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s10194-021-01276-w

DO - 10.1186/s10194-021-01276-w

M3 - Review

C2 - 34281500

VL - 22

JO - The Journal of Headache and Pain Online

JF - The Journal of Headache and Pain Online

SN - 1129-2377

IS - 1

M1 - 76

ER -

ID: 66965130