Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The case for PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect pregnant women against Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. A vaccine targeted specifically to prevent cerebral malaria - is there hope?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The GMZ2 malaria vaccine: from concept to efficacy in humans

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Pre-clinical and clinical development of the first placental malaria vaccine

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Towards clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based transmission blocking malaria vaccine

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Reliable cell and tissue morphology-based diagnosis of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in resource-constrained settings in Ghana

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Looking for Needles in the Plasmodial Haystack

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Evasion of Classical Complement Pathway Activation on Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Opsonized by PfEMP1-Specific IgG

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
Vaccines are very cost-effective tools in combating infectious disease mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, vaccines efficiently protecting against infection with malaria parasites are not available and are not likely to appear in the near future. An alternative strategy would be vaccines protecting against the disease and its consequences rather than against infection per se, by accelerating the development of the protective immunity that is normally acquired after years of exposure to malaria parasites in areas of stable transmission. This latter strategy is being energetically pursued to develop a vaccine protecting pregnant women and their offspring against mortality and morbidity caused by the accumulation of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is based on a detailed understanding of the parasite antigen and the host receptor involved in this accumulation, as well as knowledge regarding the protective immune response that is acquired in response to placental P. falciparum infection. Nevertheless, it remains controversial in some quarters whether such a vaccine would have the desired impact, or indeed whether the strategy is meaningful. This article critically examines the relevance of several perceived obstacles to development of a vaccine against placental malaria.
Original languageEnglish
JournalExpert Review of Vaccines
Volume10
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)1405-14
Number of pages10
ISSN1476-0584
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2011

ID: 32768977