Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The association between blood alcohol content and cheerfulness, focus distraction, and sluggishness among young adults attending high school parties

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Intelligence test scores before and after alcohol-related disorders - a longitudinal study of Danish male conscripts

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Ketogenic Diet Suppresses Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Rats

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Serum concentrations of mast cell tryptase are reduced in heavy drinkers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The Efficacy of Disulfiram for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Associations of school tobacco policies and legislation with youth smoking: a cross-sectional study of Danish vocational high schools

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Alcohol and delirium tremens: effects of average number of drinks per day and beverage type

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Parental alcohol use disorder with and without other mental disorders and offspring alcohol use disorder

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Impact of caller's degree-of-worry on triage response in out-of-hours telephone consultations: a randomized controlled trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Background: The belief that alcohol makes you cheerful is one of the main reasons for engaging in high-risk drinking, especially among young adults. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between blood alcohol content (BAC) and cheerfulness, focus distraction, and sluggishness among students attending high school parties. Methods: Participants included 230 students attending high school parties. BAC, measured by use of a breath analyzer, self-reported cheerfulness (on a score from 0 to 16), focus distraction (score from 0 to 8), and sluggishness (score from 0 to 4) were assessed several times during the party. Data were analyzed by means of linear regression, including robust standard errors and stratified on sex. Results: For girls, cheerfulness increased up to a BAC of 0.113 g% and decreased at higher BACs. At BACs of 0.020, 0.050, 0.100, and 0.150 g% cheerfulness was 11.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.4 to 11.6), 12.4 (95% CI: 11.8 to 12.9), 13.5 (95% CI: 13.0 to 14.0), and 13.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 14.4), respectively. For boys, the association was linear with an increase of 0.18 points in cheerfulness (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.36) for every 0.010 g% increase in BAC. Focus distraction increased with increasing BAC: 0.22 (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.28) and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.33) points for girls and boys, respectively, per 0.010 g% increase in BAC. The degree of sluggishness increased only slightly with increasing BAC with 0.02 (95% CI: 0.02 to 0.05) and 0.03 (95% CI: -0.01 to 0.07) points for every 0.010 g% increase in BAC for girls and boys, respectively. Conclusions: Cheerfulness increased up to a certain BAC value for girls, while it increased linearly for boys. Focus distraction increased with increasing BAC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume38
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)826-833
Number of pages8
ISSN0145-6008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

    Research areas

  • Blood alcohol content, Cheerfulness, Focus distraction, Sluggishness, Young adults

ID: 57283084