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Temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, and outcomes following cardiogenic shock between 2005 and 2017: a Danish registry-based cohort study

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Petersen, Line Thorgaard ; Riddersholm, Signe ; Andersen, Dennis Christian ; Polcwiartek, Christoffer ; Lee, Christina J-Y ; Lauridsen, Marie Dam ; Fosbøl, Emil ; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo ; Pareek, Manan ; Søgaard, Peter ; Torp-Pedersen, Christian ; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen ; Kragholm, Kristian Hay. / Temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, and outcomes following cardiogenic shock between 2005 and 2017 : a Danish registry-based cohort study. In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care. 2021 ; Vol. 10, No. 9. pp. 1074-1083.

Bibtex

@article{74dcc1a3d26244688fdf4f1ed09f6d63,
title = "Temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, and outcomes following cardiogenic shock between 2005 and 2017: a Danish registry-based cohort study",
abstract = "AIMS: Most cardiogenic shock (CS) studies focus on acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Contemporary data on temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, treatments, and outcomes of ACS- and in particular non-ACS-related CS patients are sparse.METHODS AND RESULTS: Using nationwide medical registries, we identified patients with first-time CS between 2005 and 2017. Cochrane-Armitage trend tests were used to examine temporal changes in presumed causes of CS, treatments, and outcomes. Among 14 363 CS patients, characteristics remained largely stable over time. As presumed causes of CS, ACS (37.1% in 2005 to 21.4% in 2017), heart failure (16.3% in 2005 to 12.0% in 2017), and arrhythmias (13.0% in 2005 to 10.9% in 2017) decreased significantly over time; cardiac arrest increased significantly (11.3% in 2005 to 24.5% in 2017); and changes in valvular heart disease were insignificant (11.5% in 2005 and 11.6% in 2017). Temporary left ventricular assist device, non-invasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use increased significantly over time; intra-aortic balloon pump and mechanical ventilation use decreased significantly. Over time, 30-day and 1-year mortality were relatively stable. Significant decreases in 30-day and 1-year mortality for patients presenting with ACS and arrhythmias and a significant increase in 1-year mortality in patients presenting with heart failure were seen.CONCLUSION: Between 2005 and 2017, we observed significant temporal decreases in ACS, heart failure, and arrhythmias as presumed causes of first-time CS, whereas cardiac arrest significantly increased. Although overall 30-day and 1-year mortality were stable, significant decreases in mortality for ACS and arrhythmias as presumed causes of CS were seen.",
keywords = "Cohort Studies, Denmark/epidemiology, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping, Registries, Shock, Cardiogenic/epidemiology",
author = "Petersen, {Line Thorgaard} and Signe Riddersholm and Andersen, {Dennis Christian} and Christoffer Polcwiartek and Lee, {Christina J-Y} and Lauridsen, {Marie Dam} and Emil Fosb{\o}l and Christiansen, {Christian Fynbo} and Manan Pareek and Peter S{\o}gaard and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Rasmussen, {Bodil Steen} and Kragholm, {Kristian Hay}",
note = "Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. {\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2021. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1093/ehjacc/zuab084",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "1074--1083",
journal = "European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care",
issn = "2048-8726",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, and outcomes following cardiogenic shock between 2005 and 2017

T2 - a Danish registry-based cohort study

AU - Petersen, Line Thorgaard

AU - Riddersholm, Signe

AU - Andersen, Dennis Christian

AU - Polcwiartek, Christoffer

AU - Lee, Christina J-Y

AU - Lauridsen, Marie Dam

AU - Fosbøl, Emil

AU - Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

AU - Pareek, Manan

AU - Søgaard, Peter

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

AU - Kragholm, Kristian Hay

N1 - Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2021. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2021/12/6

Y1 - 2021/12/6

N2 - AIMS: Most cardiogenic shock (CS) studies focus on acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Contemporary data on temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, treatments, and outcomes of ACS- and in particular non-ACS-related CS patients are sparse.METHODS AND RESULTS: Using nationwide medical registries, we identified patients with first-time CS between 2005 and 2017. Cochrane-Armitage trend tests were used to examine temporal changes in presumed causes of CS, treatments, and outcomes. Among 14 363 CS patients, characteristics remained largely stable over time. As presumed causes of CS, ACS (37.1% in 2005 to 21.4% in 2017), heart failure (16.3% in 2005 to 12.0% in 2017), and arrhythmias (13.0% in 2005 to 10.9% in 2017) decreased significantly over time; cardiac arrest increased significantly (11.3% in 2005 to 24.5% in 2017); and changes in valvular heart disease were insignificant (11.5% in 2005 and 11.6% in 2017). Temporary left ventricular assist device, non-invasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use increased significantly over time; intra-aortic balloon pump and mechanical ventilation use decreased significantly. Over time, 30-day and 1-year mortality were relatively stable. Significant decreases in 30-day and 1-year mortality for patients presenting with ACS and arrhythmias and a significant increase in 1-year mortality in patients presenting with heart failure were seen.CONCLUSION: Between 2005 and 2017, we observed significant temporal decreases in ACS, heart failure, and arrhythmias as presumed causes of first-time CS, whereas cardiac arrest significantly increased. Although overall 30-day and 1-year mortality were stable, significant decreases in mortality for ACS and arrhythmias as presumed causes of CS were seen.

AB - AIMS: Most cardiogenic shock (CS) studies focus on acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Contemporary data on temporal trends in patient characteristics, presumed causes, treatments, and outcomes of ACS- and in particular non-ACS-related CS patients are sparse.METHODS AND RESULTS: Using nationwide medical registries, we identified patients with first-time CS between 2005 and 2017. Cochrane-Armitage trend tests were used to examine temporal changes in presumed causes of CS, treatments, and outcomes. Among 14 363 CS patients, characteristics remained largely stable over time. As presumed causes of CS, ACS (37.1% in 2005 to 21.4% in 2017), heart failure (16.3% in 2005 to 12.0% in 2017), and arrhythmias (13.0% in 2005 to 10.9% in 2017) decreased significantly over time; cardiac arrest increased significantly (11.3% in 2005 to 24.5% in 2017); and changes in valvular heart disease were insignificant (11.5% in 2005 and 11.6% in 2017). Temporary left ventricular assist device, non-invasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use increased significantly over time; intra-aortic balloon pump and mechanical ventilation use decreased significantly. Over time, 30-day and 1-year mortality were relatively stable. Significant decreases in 30-day and 1-year mortality for patients presenting with ACS and arrhythmias and a significant increase in 1-year mortality in patients presenting with heart failure were seen.CONCLUSION: Between 2005 and 2017, we observed significant temporal decreases in ACS, heart failure, and arrhythmias as presumed causes of first-time CS, whereas cardiac arrest significantly increased. Although overall 30-day and 1-year mortality were stable, significant decreases in mortality for ACS and arrhythmias as presumed causes of CS were seen.

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Hospital Mortality

KW - Humans

KW - Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping

KW - Registries

KW - Shock, Cardiogenic/epidemiology

U2 - 10.1093/ehjacc/zuab084

DO - 10.1093/ehjacc/zuab084

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34648620

VL - 10

SP - 1074

EP - 1083

JO - European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care

JF - European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care

SN - 2048-8726

IS - 9

ER -

ID: 68393179