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Tactics employed by healthcare providers in Denmark to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children: a qualitative study

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@article{a68972dce7144d398542ffc2316da176,
title = "Tactics employed by healthcare providers in Denmark to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children: a qualitative study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Many asylum-seekers to Denmark come from war-torn countries where conflict and insufficient health care infrastructures disrupt vaccine programmes and result in very few children and their families presenting documentation of vaccinations on their arrival in asylum-centers. There is a need to explore how healthcare providers, in the absence of vaccine documentation, determine the vaccination needs of newly arrived refugee children.METHODS: To explore the tactics employed by healthcare professionals who screen and vaccinate asylum-seeking children in Denmark, we conducted semi-structured interviews between December 2015 and January 2016 with six healthcare professionals, including three doctors and three public health nurses. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and subjected to a thematic network analysis.RESULTS: The analysis revealed that healthcare providers adopt a number of tactics to ascertain children's immunization needs. They ask into the children's vaccination history through the use of qualified interpreters; consult WHO lists of immunization programmes worldwide; draw on tacit knowledge about country vaccination programmes; consider the background of parents; err on the side of caution and revaccinate.CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the tactics employed by healthcare providers to ascertain the immunization needs of asylum-seeking children in a western receiving country. The findings suggest a need for clear guidance at a national level on how to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children, and an international effort to secure reliable immunization documentation for migrant populations, for example through virtual immunization records.",
author = "Nakken, {Cathrine S} and Marie Norredam and Morten Skovdal",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1186/s12913-018-3661-1",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "859",
journal = "BMC Health Services Research",
issn = "1472-6963",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tactics employed by healthcare providers in Denmark to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children

T2 - a qualitative study

AU - Nakken, Cathrine S

AU - Norredam, Marie

AU - Skovdal, Morten

PY - 2018/11/14

Y1 - 2018/11/14

N2 - BACKGROUND: Many asylum-seekers to Denmark come from war-torn countries where conflict and insufficient health care infrastructures disrupt vaccine programmes and result in very few children and their families presenting documentation of vaccinations on their arrival in asylum-centers. There is a need to explore how healthcare providers, in the absence of vaccine documentation, determine the vaccination needs of newly arrived refugee children.METHODS: To explore the tactics employed by healthcare professionals who screen and vaccinate asylum-seeking children in Denmark, we conducted semi-structured interviews between December 2015 and January 2016 with six healthcare professionals, including three doctors and three public health nurses. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and subjected to a thematic network analysis.RESULTS: The analysis revealed that healthcare providers adopt a number of tactics to ascertain children's immunization needs. They ask into the children's vaccination history through the use of qualified interpreters; consult WHO lists of immunization programmes worldwide; draw on tacit knowledge about country vaccination programmes; consider the background of parents; err on the side of caution and revaccinate.CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the tactics employed by healthcare providers to ascertain the immunization needs of asylum-seeking children in a western receiving country. The findings suggest a need for clear guidance at a national level on how to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children, and an international effort to secure reliable immunization documentation for migrant populations, for example through virtual immunization records.

AB - BACKGROUND: Many asylum-seekers to Denmark come from war-torn countries where conflict and insufficient health care infrastructures disrupt vaccine programmes and result in very few children and their families presenting documentation of vaccinations on their arrival in asylum-centers. There is a need to explore how healthcare providers, in the absence of vaccine documentation, determine the vaccination needs of newly arrived refugee children.METHODS: To explore the tactics employed by healthcare professionals who screen and vaccinate asylum-seeking children in Denmark, we conducted semi-structured interviews between December 2015 and January 2016 with six healthcare professionals, including three doctors and three public health nurses. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and subjected to a thematic network analysis.RESULTS: The analysis revealed that healthcare providers adopt a number of tactics to ascertain children's immunization needs. They ask into the children's vaccination history through the use of qualified interpreters; consult WHO lists of immunization programmes worldwide; draw on tacit knowledge about country vaccination programmes; consider the background of parents; err on the side of caution and revaccinate.CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the tactics employed by healthcare providers to ascertain the immunization needs of asylum-seeking children in a western receiving country. The findings suggest a need for clear guidance at a national level on how to determine the vaccination needs of asylum-seeking children, and an international effort to secure reliable immunization documentation for migrant populations, for example through virtual immunization records.

U2 - 10.1186/s12913-018-3661-1

DO - 10.1186/s12913-018-3661-1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

SP - 859

JO - BMC Health Services Research

JF - BMC Health Services Research

SN - 1472-6963

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 55650712