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Systemic immunogenicity of para-Phenylenediamine and Diphenylcyclopropenone: two potent contact allergy-inducing haptens

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p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) and Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) are two potent haptens. Both haptens are known to cause delayed-type hypersensitivity, involving a cytokine response and local infiltration of T-cell subpopulations, resulting in contact dermatitis. We investigated the systemic immune effects of PPD and DPCP, two relatively unexplored skin allergens. The dorsal sides of the ears of BALB/c mice were exposed to PPD or DPCP (0.1% w/v or 0.01% w/v), or vehicle alone. Mice were treated once daily for 3 days (induction period) and subsequently twice per week for 8 weeks. Local and systemic immune responses in the auricular and pancreatic lymph nodes, spleen, liver, serum, and ears were analyzed with cytokine profiling MSD, flow cytometry, and qPCR. Ear swelling increased significantly in mice treated with 1% PPD, 0.01% DPCP or 0.1% DPCP, compared with vehicle treatment, indicating that the mice were sensitized and that there was a local inflammation. Auricular lymph nodes, pancreatic lymph nodes, spleen, and liver showed changes in regulatory T-cell, B-cell, and NKT-cell frequencies, and increased activation of CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Intracellular cytokine profiling revealed an increase in the IFN-γ- and IL-4-positive NKT cells present in the liver following treatment with both haptens. Moreover, we saw a tendency toward a systemic increase in IL-17A. We observed systemic immunological effects of PPD and DPCP. Furthermore, concentrations too low to increase ear thickness and cause clinical symptoms may still prime the immune system. These systemic immunological effects may potentially predispose individuals to certain diseases.

Original languageEnglish
JournalImmunologic Research
Volume58
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)40-50
Number of pages11
ISSN0257-277X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

ID: 44265297