Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Supraclavicular Approach to Ultrasound-Guided Brachiocephalic Vein Cannulation in Children and Neonates

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Extremely Preterm Infant Admissions Within the SafeBoosC-III Consortium During the COVID-19 Lockdown

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Supplemental Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Radiographic Imaging to Evaluate Food Passage Rate in Preterm Piglets as a Model for Preterm Infants

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Delivery Modality Affect Neonatal Levels of Inflammation, Stress, and Growth Factors

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Parents' Views of Family-Centered Care at a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit-A Qualitative Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Zied Merchaoui
  • Ulrik Lausten-Thomsen
  • Florence Pierre
  • Maher Ben Laiba
  • Nolwenn Le Saché
  • Pierre Tissieres
View graph of relations

The correct choice of intra vascular access in critically ill neonates should be individualized depending on the type and duration of therapy, gestational and chronological age, weight and/or size, diagnosis, clinical status, and venous system patency. Accordingly, there is an ongoing demand for optimization of catheterization. Recently, the use of ultrasound (US)-guided cannulation of the subclavian vein (SCV) has been described in children and neonates. This article gives an overview of the current use of US for achieving central venous catheter placement in the SCV or the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) in neonates. More than 1,250 catheters have been reported inserted in children and neonates for a cumulated success rate of 98.4% and the complication rate is reported to be low. The technical aspects of various approaches are discussed, and we offer our recommendation of an US-guided technique for SCV and BCV cannulation based on our experience in a large NICU setting. Although the cannulation the SCV or BCV does not substitute the use of peripherally inserted central catheters or umbilical venous central catheters in neonates, it is a feasible route in very small children who are in need of a large caliber central venous access.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Pediatrics
Volume5
Pages (from-to)211
ISSN2296-2360
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

ID: 62444828