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Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: a cross sectional study

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Nelson, A, Gavelin, HM, Boraxbekk, C-J, Eskilsson, T, Josefsson, M, Slunga Järvholm, L & Neely, AS 2021, 'Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: a cross sectional study', BMC Psychology, vol. 9, no. 1, 84, pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-021-00576-9

APA

Nelson, A., Gavelin, H. M., Boraxbekk, C-J., Eskilsson, T., Josefsson, M., Slunga Järvholm, L., & Neely, A. S. (2021). Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: a cross sectional study. BMC Psychology, 9(1), 1-13. [84]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-021-00576-9

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Author

Nelson, Andreas ; Gavelin, Hanna Malmberg ; Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan ; Eskilsson, Therese ; Josefsson, Maria ; Slunga Järvholm, Lisbeth ; Neely, Anna Stigsdotter. / Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder : a cross sectional study. In: BMC Psychology. 2021 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 1-13.

Bibtex

@article{37b1a5bcc8974e1dba51ec113d11b513,
title = "Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: a cross sectional study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Stress-related exhaustion is associated with cognitive impairment as measured by both subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and objective cognitive test performance. This study aimed to examine how patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder differ from healthy control participants in regard to levels and type of SCCs, and if SCCs are associated with cognitive test performance and psychological distress.METHODS: We compared a group of patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder (n = 103, female = 88) with matched healthy controls (n = 58, female = 47) cross-sectionally, concerning the type and magnitude of self-reported SCCs. We furthermore explored the association between SCCs and cognitive test performance as well as with self-reported depression, anxiety and burnout levels, in the patient and the control group, respectively.RESULTS: Patients reported considerably more cognitive failures and were more likely than controls to express memory failures in situations providing few external cues and reminders in the environment. In both groups, SCCs were associated with demographic and psychological factors, and not with cognitive test performance.CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the high burden of cognitive problems experienced by patients with exhaustion disorder, particularly in executively demanding tasks without external cognitive support. From a clinical perspective, SCCs and objective cognitive test performance may measure different aspects of cognitive functioning, and external cognitive aids could be of value in stress rehabilitation.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Participants were recruited as part of the Rehabilitation for Improved Cognition (RECO) study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772). Date of registration: 8 March 2017.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Cognition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Neuropsychological Tests, Stress, Psychological, Subjective cognitive complaints, Burnout, Exhaustion, Stress-induced, Stress",
author = "Andreas Nelson and Gavelin, {Hanna Malmberg} and Carl-Johan Boraxbekk and Therese Eskilsson and Maria Josefsson and {Slunga J{\"a}rvholm}, Lisbeth and Neely, {Anna Stigsdotter}",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "18",
doi = "10.1186/s40359-021-00576-9",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "BMC Psychology",
issn = "2050-7283",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder

T2 - a cross sectional study

AU - Nelson, Andreas

AU - Gavelin, Hanna Malmberg

AU - Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan

AU - Eskilsson, Therese

AU - Josefsson, Maria

AU - Slunga Järvholm, Lisbeth

AU - Neely, Anna Stigsdotter

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/18

Y1 - 2021/5/18

N2 - BACKGROUND: Stress-related exhaustion is associated with cognitive impairment as measured by both subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and objective cognitive test performance. This study aimed to examine how patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder differ from healthy control participants in regard to levels and type of SCCs, and if SCCs are associated with cognitive test performance and psychological distress.METHODS: We compared a group of patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder (n = 103, female = 88) with matched healthy controls (n = 58, female = 47) cross-sectionally, concerning the type and magnitude of self-reported SCCs. We furthermore explored the association between SCCs and cognitive test performance as well as with self-reported depression, anxiety and burnout levels, in the patient and the control group, respectively.RESULTS: Patients reported considerably more cognitive failures and were more likely than controls to express memory failures in situations providing few external cues and reminders in the environment. In both groups, SCCs were associated with demographic and psychological factors, and not with cognitive test performance.CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the high burden of cognitive problems experienced by patients with exhaustion disorder, particularly in executively demanding tasks without external cognitive support. From a clinical perspective, SCCs and objective cognitive test performance may measure different aspects of cognitive functioning, and external cognitive aids could be of value in stress rehabilitation.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Participants were recruited as part of the Rehabilitation for Improved Cognition (RECO) study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772). Date of registration: 8 March 2017.

AB - BACKGROUND: Stress-related exhaustion is associated with cognitive impairment as measured by both subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and objective cognitive test performance. This study aimed to examine how patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder differ from healthy control participants in regard to levels and type of SCCs, and if SCCs are associated with cognitive test performance and psychological distress.METHODS: We compared a group of patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder (n = 103, female = 88) with matched healthy controls (n = 58, female = 47) cross-sectionally, concerning the type and magnitude of self-reported SCCs. We furthermore explored the association between SCCs and cognitive test performance as well as with self-reported depression, anxiety and burnout levels, in the patient and the control group, respectively.RESULTS: Patients reported considerably more cognitive failures and were more likely than controls to express memory failures in situations providing few external cues and reminders in the environment. In both groups, SCCs were associated with demographic and psychological factors, and not with cognitive test performance.CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the high burden of cognitive problems experienced by patients with exhaustion disorder, particularly in executively demanding tasks without external cognitive support. From a clinical perspective, SCCs and objective cognitive test performance may measure different aspects of cognitive functioning, and external cognitive aids could be of value in stress rehabilitation.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Participants were recruited as part of the Rehabilitation for Improved Cognition (RECO) study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772). Date of registration: 8 March 2017.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Cognition

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Neuropsychological Tests

KW - Stress, Psychological

KW - Subjective cognitive complaints

KW - Burnout

KW - Exhaustion

KW - Stress-induced

KW - Stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85106193025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s40359-021-00576-9

DO - 10.1186/s40359-021-00576-9

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34006315

VL - 9

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - BMC Psychology

JF - BMC Psychology

SN - 2050-7283

IS - 1

M1 - 84

ER -

ID: 65655411