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Subclinical depressive symptoms during late midlife and structural brain alterations: A longitudinal study of Danish men born in 1953

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@article{74a4f56b6b5a47c89ffc6f736784c52b,
title = "Subclinical depressive symptoms during late midlife and structural brain alterations: A longitudinal study of Danish men born in 1953",
abstract = "We explored whether depressive symptoms measured three times during midlife were associated with structural brain alterations quantified using magnetic resonance imaging measurements of volume, cortical thickness, and intensity texture. In 192 men born in 1953 with depressive symptoms measured at age 51, 56, and 59 years, magnetic resonance imaging was performed at age 59. All data processing was performed using the Freesurfer software package except for the texture-scores that were computed using in-house software. Structural brain alterations and associations between depressive symptoms and brain structure outcomes were tested using Pearson's correlation, t test, and linear regression. Depressive symptoms at age 51 showed clear inverse correlations with total gray matter, pallidum, and hippocampal volume with the strongest estimate for hippocampal volume (r = -.22, p < .01). After exclusion of men (n = 3) with scores in the range of clinical depression the inverse correlation between depressive symptoms and hippocampal volume became insignificant (r = -13, p = .08). Depressive symptoms at age 59 correlated positively with hippocampal and amygdala texture-potential early markers of atrophy. Inverse relations with total gray matter and pallidum volumes lost significance when the analysis was adjusted for intracranial volume. In men, depressive symptoms at age 51 were associated with a reduced volume of the hippocampus at age 59 independent of later symptoms. Amygdala and hippocampal textures might be the early markers for brain alterations associated with depression in midlife.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Merete Osler and Lauge S{\o}rensen and Maarten Rozing and Calvo, {Oriol Puig} and Mads Nielsen and Egill Rostrup",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1002/hbm.23954",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "1789--1795",
journal = "Human Brain Mapping",
issn = "1065-9471",
publisher = "John/Wiley & Sons, Inc. John/Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Subclinical depressive symptoms during late midlife and structural brain alterations

T2 - A longitudinal study of Danish men born in 1953

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Sørensen, Lauge

AU - Rozing, Maarten

AU - Calvo, Oriol Puig

AU - Nielsen, Mads

AU - Rostrup, Egill

N1 - © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - We explored whether depressive symptoms measured three times during midlife were associated with structural brain alterations quantified using magnetic resonance imaging measurements of volume, cortical thickness, and intensity texture. In 192 men born in 1953 with depressive symptoms measured at age 51, 56, and 59 years, magnetic resonance imaging was performed at age 59. All data processing was performed using the Freesurfer software package except for the texture-scores that were computed using in-house software. Structural brain alterations and associations between depressive symptoms and brain structure outcomes were tested using Pearson's correlation, t test, and linear regression. Depressive symptoms at age 51 showed clear inverse correlations with total gray matter, pallidum, and hippocampal volume with the strongest estimate for hippocampal volume (r = -.22, p < .01). After exclusion of men (n = 3) with scores in the range of clinical depression the inverse correlation between depressive symptoms and hippocampal volume became insignificant (r = -13, p = .08). Depressive symptoms at age 59 correlated positively with hippocampal and amygdala texture-potential early markers of atrophy. Inverse relations with total gray matter and pallidum volumes lost significance when the analysis was adjusted for intracranial volume. In men, depressive symptoms at age 51 were associated with a reduced volume of the hippocampus at age 59 independent of later symptoms. Amygdala and hippocampal textures might be the early markers for brain alterations associated with depression in midlife.

AB - We explored whether depressive symptoms measured three times during midlife were associated with structural brain alterations quantified using magnetic resonance imaging measurements of volume, cortical thickness, and intensity texture. In 192 men born in 1953 with depressive symptoms measured at age 51, 56, and 59 years, magnetic resonance imaging was performed at age 59. All data processing was performed using the Freesurfer software package except for the texture-scores that were computed using in-house software. Structural brain alterations and associations between depressive symptoms and brain structure outcomes were tested using Pearson's correlation, t test, and linear regression. Depressive symptoms at age 51 showed clear inverse correlations with total gray matter, pallidum, and hippocampal volume with the strongest estimate for hippocampal volume (r = -.22, p < .01). After exclusion of men (n = 3) with scores in the range of clinical depression the inverse correlation between depressive symptoms and hippocampal volume became insignificant (r = -13, p = .08). Depressive symptoms at age 59 correlated positively with hippocampal and amygdala texture-potential early markers of atrophy. Inverse relations with total gray matter and pallidum volumes lost significance when the analysis was adjusted for intracranial volume. In men, depressive symptoms at age 51 were associated with a reduced volume of the hippocampus at age 59 independent of later symptoms. Amygdala and hippocampal textures might be the early markers for brain alterations associated with depression in midlife.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1002/hbm.23954

DO - 10.1002/hbm.23954

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 1789

EP - 1795

JO - Human Brain Mapping

JF - Human Brain Mapping

SN - 1065-9471

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 52397789