Spinal anaesthesia versus general anaesthesia (SAGA) on recovery after hip and knee arthroplasty: A study protocol for three randomized, single-blinded, multi-centre, clinical trials

Christian Bredgaard Jensen*, Kirill Gromov, Nicolai Bang Foss, Henrik Kehlet, Lina Pleckaitiene, Claus Varnum, Anders Troelsen

*Corresponding author for this work
2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mobilisation difficulties, due to muscle weakness, and urinary retention are common reasons for prolonged admission following hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Whether spinal anaesthesia is detrimental to early mobilisation is controversial. Previous studies have reported differences in post-operative recovery between spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia; however, up-to-date comparisons in fast-track setups are needed. Our randomized, single-blinded, multi-centre, clinical trials aim to compare the post-operative recovery after total hip (THA), total knee (TKA), and unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKA) respectively when using either spinal anaesthesia (SA) or general anaesthesia (GA) in a fast-track setup. Included patients (74 THA, 74 TKA, and 74 UKA patients) are randomized (1:1) to receive either SA (2 mL 0.5% Bupivacaine) or GA (Induction: Propofol 1.0-2.0 mg/kg iv with Remifentanil 3-5 mcg/kg iv. Infusion: Propofol 3-5 mg/kg/h and Remifentanil 0.5 mcg/kg/min iv). Patients undergo standard primary unilateral hip and knee arthroplasty procedures in an optimized fast-track setup with intraoperative local infiltrative analgesia in TKA and UKA, post-operative multimodal opioid sparing analgesia, immediate mobilisation with full weightbearing, no drains and in-hospital only thromboprophylaxis. Data will be collected on the day of surgery and until patients are discharged. The primary outcome is the ability to be safely mobilised during a 5-m walking test within 6 h of surgery. Secondary outcomes include fulfilment of discharge criteria, post-operative pain, dizziness, and nausea as well as patient reported recovery and opioid related side effects. Data will also be gathered on all hospital contacts within 30-days of surgery. This study will offer insights into advantages and disadvantages of anaesthetic methods used in fast-track arthroplasty surgery.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume68
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)137-143
Number of pages7
ISSN0001-5172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Analgesics, Opioid
  • Anesthesia, General/methods
  • Anesthesia, Spinal/methods
  • Anticoagulants
  • Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects
  • Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects
  • Humans
  • Multicenter Studies as Topic
  • Propofol
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Remifentanil
  • Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
  • arthroplasty
  • enhanced recovery
  • hip
  • knee
  • fast-track
  • anaesthesia

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