Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Socioeconomic predictors of human papillomavirus vaccination in Danish men - A nationwide study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Prevalence, incidence, and natural history of HPV infection in adult women ages 24 to 45 participating in a vaccine trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Time and temperature dependent analytical stability of dry-collected Evalyn HPV self-sampling brush for cervical cancer screening

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Clinical and analytical performance of the BD Onclarity™ HPV assay for detection of CIN2+ lesions on SurePath samples

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Endometrial cancer risk after fertility treatment: a population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. HPV types, cervical high-grade lesions and risk factors for oncogenic human papillomavirus infection among 3416 Tanzanian women

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Ovarian and Breast Cancer Risks Associated With Pathogenic Variants in RAD51C and RAD51D

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Gynaecological cancer leads to long-term sick leave and permanently reduced working ability years after diagnosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine was licensed in Denmark in 2006. Unlike women, men are not offered human papillomavirus vaccination free of charge but can have it at their own expense. We investigated human papillomavirus vaccine uptake by men in Denmark and the socioeconomic factors that may predict human papillomavirus vaccination.

METHODS: Using the Civil Registration System, we identified all boys and men aged 9-26 years in 2006-2013 and their mothers. By linkage to Statistics Denmark and the National Prescription Registry, we obtained information on socioeconomic variables and human papillomavirus vaccination during the study period. Using Cox regression, we examined the associations between socioeconomic variables and human papillomavirus vaccination.

RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2013, 6253 (0.8%) males aged 9-26 years were vaccinated against human papillomavirus. The strongest predictor identified was ethnicity. Males who were immigrants (hazard ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.180) or sons of immigrant parents (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.17) were less likely to be vaccinated than Danish males. Additionally, sons of mothers who were unemployed, unmarried, had a low income, and basic education initiated human papillomavirus vaccination less frequently. Finally, sons of mothers who were physicians or nurses were more likely to be vaccinated than sons of other highly educated mothers.

CONCLUSION: We found low uptake, with social disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination of boys and young men in Denmark.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPapillomavirus research (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Volume3
Pages (from-to)18-23
Number of pages6
ISSN2405-8521
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 52206678