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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Socioeconomic position and participation in colorectal cancer screening

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  1. Total burden of disease in cancer patients at diagnosis-a Danish nationwide study of multimorbidity and redeemed medication

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  2. The role of H1 antihistamines in contralateral breast cancer: a Danish nationwide cohort study

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  3. Plasma total cell-free DNA is a prognostic biomarker of overall survival in metastatic solid tumour patients

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  1. Detection of illness worry in the general population: A specific item on illness rumination improves the Whiteley Index

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  2. Novel functions of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor in prostate cancer cells and patients

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  3. Cardiac Troponin I and Incident Stroke in European Cohorts: Insights From the BiomarCaRE Project

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  4. AZGP1 Protein Expression in Hormone-Naïve Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated with Primary Androgen Deprivation Therapy

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Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with faecal occult blood test (FOBT) has the potential to reduce the incidence and mortality of CRC. Screening uptake is known to be inferior in people with low socioeconomic position (SEP) when compared with those with high position; however, the results of most previous studies have limited value because they are based on recall or area-based measures of socioeconomic position, and might thus be subject to selective participation and misclassification. In this study we investigated differences in CRC screening participation using register-based individual information on education, employment, and income to encompass different but related aspects of socioeconomic stratification. Also, the impact of ethnicity and cohabiting status was analysed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume103
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)1496-501
Number of pages6
ISSN0007-0920
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Nov 2010

ID: 31031683