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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Socioeconomic position and one-year mortality risk among patients with heart failure: A nationwide register-based cohort study

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  1. Regional variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: incidence and survival - a nationwide study of regions in Denmark

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Genome-wide association and Mendelian randomisation analysis provide insights into the pathogenesis of heart failure

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  3. Time in therapeutic range and risk of thromboembolism and bleeding in patients with a mechanical heart valve prosthesis

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  4. Chronic Paradoxes: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Family Perspectives on Living With Congenital Heart Defects

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AIMS: We sought to determine whether socioeconomic position affects the survival of patients with heart failure treated in a national healthcare system.

METHODS: We linked national Danish registers, identified 145,690 patients with new-onset heart failure between 2000 and 2015, and obtained information on education and income levels. We analysed differences in survival by income quartile and educational level using multiple Cox regression, stratified by sex. We standardised one-year mortality risks according to income level by age, year of diagnosis, cohabitation status, educational level, comorbidities and medical treatment of all patients. We standardised one-year mortality risk according to educational level by age and year of diagnosis.

RESULTS: One-year mortality was inversely related to income. In women the standardised average one-year mortality risk was 28.0% in the lowest income quartile and 24.3% in the highest income quartile, a risk difference of -3.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) -4.9% to -2.6%). In men the standardised one-year mortality risk was 26.1% in the lowest income quartile and 20.2% in the highest income quartile, a risk difference of -5.8% (95% CI -6.8% to -4.9%). Similar gradients in standardised mortality were present between the highest and lowest educational levels: -6.6% (95% CI -9.6% to -3.5%) among women and -5.0% (95% CI -6.3% to -3.7%) among men.

CONCLUSIONS: Income and educational level affect the survival of patients with heart failure, even in a national health system. Research is needed to investigate how socioeconomic differences affect survival.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean journal of preventive cardiology
Volume27
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)79-88
ISSN2047-4873
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

ID: 57655438