Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Socioeconomic position and first-time major cardiovascular event in patients with type 2 diabetes: a Danish nationwide cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Short-term prognosis of normalising serum potassium following an episode of hypokalaemia in patients with chronic heart failure

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Non-adherence to established dietary guidelines associated with increased mortality: the Copenhagen General Population Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Temporal trends in utilization of transcatheter aortic valve replacement and patient characteristics: a nationwide study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Diabetes increases the risk of bone fractures in patients on kidney replacement therapy: A DANISH national cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Pharmacoepidemiological methods for computing the duration of pharmacological prescriptions using secondary data sources

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Temporal variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest occurrence in individuals with or without diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

AIMS : The association between socioeconomic position and cardiovascular disease has not been well studied in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine the association between socioeconomic position and first-time major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS AND RESULTS : Through the Danish nationwide registers, we identified all residents with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes between 2012 and 2017. Based on sex-stratified multivariable cause-specific Cox regression models, we calculated the standardized absolute 5-year risk of the composite outcome of first-time myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular mortality (MACE) according to income quartiles. A total of 57 106 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. During 155 989 person years, first-time MACE occurred in 2139 patients. Among both men and women, income was inversely associated with the standardized absolute 5-year risk of MACE. In men, the 5-year risk of MACE increased from 5.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9-6.5] in the highest income quartile to 9.3% (CI 8.3-10.2) in the lowest income group, with a risk difference of 3.5% (CI 2.4-4.7). In women, the risk of MACE increased from 4.2% (CI 3.4-5.0) to 6.1% (CI 5.2-7.0) according to income level, with a risk difference of 1.9% (CI 0.8-2.9).

CONCLUSION : Despite free access to medical care in Denmark, low-socioeconomic position was associated with a higher 5-year risk of first-time MACE in patients with incident type 2 diabetes. Our results suggest prevention strategies could be developed specifically for patients with low-socioeconomic position.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventive Cardiology
ISSN2047-4873
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 May 2021

Bibliographical note

Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2021. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

ID: 68136139