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Socioeconomic and humanistic burden of illness of excessive daytime sleepiness severity associated with obstructive sleep apnoea in the European Union 5

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  • Poul Jennum
  • JeanPierre Coaquira Castro
  • Sam Mettam
  • Tatiana Kharkevitch
  • M Janelle Cambron-Mellott
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OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Evaluate the impact of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) severity on burden of illness among adults with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in European Union 5 (EU5) countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom).

PATIENTS/METHODS: This retrospective observational study used data from the 2017 EU5 National Health and Wellness Survey, a self-administered, internet-based, non-screening survey. Respondents who self-reported both having experienced OSA in the last 12 months and having had their OSA diagnosed by a physician were considered to have OSA. Respondents completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and were consequently categorised into 4 groups: OSA-with-EDS (ESS >10) subdivided by EDS severity (mild [ESS = 11-12], moderate [ESS = 13-15], severe [ESS = 16-24]), and OSA-without-EDS (ESS ≤10). Bivariate and multivariable analyses examined group differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL), work productivity and activity impairment, and health care utilisation.

RESULTS: The analysis included 2008 respondents with OSA: n = 661 (32.9%) with EDS (29.5% mild, 34.5% moderate, 36.0% severe) and n = 1347 without EDS. Compared with the OSA-without-EDS group, the OSA-with-EDS subgroups generally had higher rates of obesity, depression, and other reported comorbidities. Greater severity of EDS was associated with worse self-reported HRQoL (all domains, P < 0.001) and work productivity and activity impairment (absenteeism, P = 0.031; presenteeism, overall work impairment, and non-work activity impairment, P < 0.001), as well as increased numbers of health care provider visits (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Compared to patients with OSA but without EDS, those with EDS had substantially higher socioeconomic and humanistic burden of disease, which was more profound among those reporting greater EDS.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume84
Pages (from-to)46-55
Number of pages10
ISSN1389-9457
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • Adult, Cost of Illness, Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology, European Union, Humans, Quality of Life, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology, Socioeconomic Factors

ID: 72158448