Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Smoking related to 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate: a study in 352 normotensive Danish subjects

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Urinary Sodium and Potassium, and Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke (INTERSTROKE): a case-control study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Role of Inflammatory Biomarkers in the Prevalence and Incidence of Hypertension Among HIV-Positive Participants in the START Trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Cardiovascular Outcome in Relation to Progression to Hypertension in the Copenhagen MONICA Cohort

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in 352 normal Danish subjects, related to age and gender

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Room for improvement: Initiation of lipid lowering treatment and achievement of lipid target levels - a Danish registry-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Prognostic Value of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Anvendt klinisk farmakologi

    Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

  4. Cardiovascular risk management: A nationwide register-based study of patterns and secular changes of discontinuation prior to death

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

This study shows the association between smoking and both office and ambulatory blood pressure. By means of stratification, a uniform number of subjects of both sexes and spanning 6 decades (aged 20 to 79 years) were recruited randomly from the local community register. A total of 352 subjects participated, including 161 smokers. Smokers (both sexes and all age groups summed), as compared with nonsmokers had statistically significant lower office blood pressure as follows (mean systolic +/- SED/mean diastolic +/- SED): (systolic and diastolic, -6.8 +/- 2.1/-3.9 +/- 1.3); day ambulatory blood pressure (diastolic, /-2.8 +/- 1.0); and night ambulatory blood pressure (systolic and diastolic, -4.2 +/- 1.8/-3.9 +/- 1.1). The intraperson variability of the day ambulatory blood pressure (as measured every 15 min) was identical for the smokers and the nonsmokers. Smokers were found to have a diminished "white coat" effect; this diminished white coat effect has not previously been described. The major white coat effect was seen in the older nonsmokers, whereas the diminished white coat effect was most pronounced in the older male smokers and in the younger female smokers. Smokers seem to have a diminished white coat effect, as well as a lower ambulatory blood pressure throughout the day (diastolic) and at night (systolic and diastolic). The similar intraperson variability found in the smokers' and nonsmokers' blood pressure further speaks for a consistently lower blood pressure in smokers as compared with nonsmokers.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume10
Issue number5 Pt 1
Pages (from-to)483-91
Number of pages9
ISSN0895-7061
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1997

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Blood Pressure/physiology, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Heart Rate/physiology, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Physician-Patient Relations, Smoking, Stress, Psychological/physiopathology

ID: 67536069