Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise: insight from heart rate pacing during exercise with a trained and a deconditioned muscle group

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Level of Physical Activity, Left Ventricular Mass, Hypertension, and Prognosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Dose-Response Association Between Level of Physical Activity and Mortality in Normal, Elevated, and High Blood Pressure

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Opposing Age-Related Trends in Absolute and Relative Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes Associated With Out-of-Office Blood Pressure

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Five-Year Randomized Study Demonstrates Blood Pressure Increases in Young Women With Turner Syndrome Regardless of Estradiol Dose

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Muscle-liver substrate fluxes in exercising humans and potential effects on hepatic metabolism

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Screening relatives in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy: yield of imaging and electrical investigations

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P
Original languageEnglish
JournalHypertension
Volume61
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)1126-33
Number of pages8
ISSN0194-911X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

    Research areas

  • Adenosine Triphosphate, Adult, Blood Pressure, Cardiac Output, Exercise, Heart Rate, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Lactates, Leg, Male, Muscle, Skeletal, Norepinephrine, Physical Endurance, Potassium, Pulmonary Wedge Pressure, Stroke Volume

ID: 41954973