Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Sex differences in oncogenic mutational processes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Common variants in Alzheimer's disease and risk stratification by polygenic risk scores

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Quantitative single-cell proteomics as a tool to characterize cellular hierarchies

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. FUT2-ABO epistasis increases the risk of early childhood asthma and Streptococcus pneumoniae respiratory illnesses

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Author Correction: Mutational and putative neoantigen load predict clinical benefit of adoptive T cell therapy in melanoma

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

  1. Clinical impact of clonal hematopoiesis in patients with lymphoma undergoing ASCT: a national population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Retrospective evaluation of whole exome and genome mutation calls in 746 cancer samples

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Sex differences have been observed in multiple facets of cancer epidemiology, treatment and biology, and in most cancers outside the sex organs. Efforts to link these clinical differences to specific molecular features have focused on somatic mutations within the coding regions of the genome. Here we report a pan-cancer analysis of sex differences in whole genomes of 1983 tumours of 28 subtypes as part of the ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium. We both confirm the results of exome studies, and also uncover previously undescribed sex differences. These include sex-biases in coding and non-coding cancer drivers, mutation prevalence and strikingly, in mutational signatures related to underlying mutational processes. These results underline the pervasiveness of molecular sex differences and strengthen the call for increased consideration of sex in molecular cancer research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Communications
Volume11
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)4330
ISSN2041-1723
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Aug 2020

    Research areas

  • Chromosomal Instability, Exome, Female, Genome, Human, Genomic Instability, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Mutation, Neoplasms/genetics, Oncogenes/genetics, Open Reading Frames, Sex Characteristics, beta Catenin/genetics

ID: 61639169