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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Scratching the surface: the processing of pain from deep tissues

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Although most pain research focuses on skin, muscles, joints and viscerae are major sources of pain. We discuss the mechanisms of deep pains arising from somatic and visceral structures and how this can lead to widespread manifestations and chronification. We include how both altered peripheral and central sensory neurotransmission lead to deep pain states and comment on key areas such as top-down modulation where little is known. It is vital that the clinical characterization of deep pain in patients is improved to allow for back translation to preclinical models so that the missing links can be ascertained. The contribution of deeper somatic and visceral tissues to various chronic pain syndromes is common but there is much we need to know.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPain Management
Volume6
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)95-102
Number of pages8
ISSN1758-1869
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

    Research areas

  • Chronic Pain, Humans, Joints, Muscles, Nociception, Peripheral Nervous System, Viscera, Visceral Pain, Journal Article

ID: 49812121