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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Sciatic neuropathy as first sign of metastasising prostate cancer

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  1. Severe hypophosphataemia following oral bisphosphonate treatment in a patient with osteoporosis

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  2. Intracranial entrapment of a haemodialysis catheter guidewire

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  3. Rare cause of spontaneous haemothorax: mediastinal and distant lymph node metastases from uveal melanoma

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  4. Acquired complement C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency in a patient with a rare SERPING1 variant with unknown significance

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  1. Opening of BKCa channels alters cerebral hemodynamic and causes headache in healthy volunteers

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  2. The migraine landscape on YouTube: A review of YouTube as a source of information on migraine

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  3. Mid- to late-life migraine diagnoses and risk of dementia: a national register-based follow-up study

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  4. European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2020

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  5. Effect of KATP channel blocker glibenclamide on levcromakalim-induced headache

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Peripheral neuropathies are among the most common neurological diseases and have numerous causes, including diabetes, alcohol, hereditary, toxic, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, ischaemic and paraneoplastic. Often, however, no definitive cause is identified and the condition is termed idiopathic neuropathy. Here we describe a patient who was initially diagnosed with idiopathic sciatic neuropathy but who was eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is an uncommon manifestation of prostate cancer, and the diagnostic was difficult because prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was normal and the positron emission tomography scan negative. Changes in PSA should always raise the suspicion of prostate cancer, just as idiopathic progressive neuropathy should always raise the suspicion of an underlying malignancy, even when standard diagnostics fail to explain the patient's symptoms.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ Case Reports
ISSN1757-790X
Publication statusPublished - 2010

ID: 34797798