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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Satisfaction with mental health treatment among patients with a non-Western migrant background: a survey in a Danish specialized outpatient mental health clinic

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BACKGROUND: Global migration increases ethnic and cultural diversity and demands mental health services to adapt to provide all patients with equal access to good quality care. Patient satisfaction surveys can inform this service delivery, thus we explored patient satisfaction among non-Western migrants receiving treatment in a Danish specialized outpatient mental health clinic [Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP)].

METHODS: We used multivariate logistic regression models to estimate associations between 'Overall treatment satisfaction' and treatment-related items plus potential confounders from a cross-sectional patient satisfaction survey (n = 686). The satisfaction questionnaire was a self-report measurement tool developed locally at CTP. Participants were non-Western migrants above 18 years with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or depression diagnoses according to ICD-10.

RESULTS: Most participants (n = 497; 82.6%) reported overall satisfaction with their mental health treatment, but less than half (n = 311; 48.8%) reported an improvement in health and situation after end of treatment. Participants who experienced a subjective improvement in their health and situation had significantly higher odds of being satisfied with their mental health treatment [odds ratio (OR) = 8.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.0-18.1]. Perceptions of influence on the treatment course (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 2.4-9.2), and of understanding and respect for one's cultural background (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.5-7.6) were significantly associated with treatment satisfaction. Age and sex were insignificant in the final regression model.

CONCLUSIONS: Implications for practice based on our findings are to enhance person-centred care and shared decision-making with all patients regardless of cultural background and to prioritize pre- and postgraduate training in cultural competences and cultural humility for healthcare providers.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
ISSN1101-1262
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jun 2019

    Research areas

  • Health Sciences - Transcultural Psychiatry, Health System Research, Observational Study

ID: 57342702