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Risk of infectious diseases among first-degree relatives of transplant recipients who develop CMV infection: is the infectious phenotype inheritable?

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Transplant recipients are at high risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Mechanisms explaining the variation in risk of infections are far from fully elucidated. We hypothesised that host genetics explains part of the variation in risk of infection and examined if relatives of recipients with CMV infection have higher rates of severe infections compared to relatives of recipients without this infectious phenotype. In a register-based study, we included first-degree relatives of transplant recipients and examined the risk of hospitalisation due to overall infection or viral infection and risk of death among relatives of recipients who developed CMV infection within the first year of transplantation compared to relatives of recipients without CMV. Analyses were adjusted for sex, age and calendar year. We included 4470 relatives who were followed for 103,786 person-years, median follow-up 24 years [interquartile range (IQR) 12-36]. There were a total of 1360 infection-related hospitalisations in the follow-up period, incidence rate (IR) 13.1/1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI), 12.4; 13.8]. 206 relatives were hospitalised with viral infection, IR 1.8/1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.6; 2.0). There was no increased risk of hospitalisation due to infections, IR ratio (IRR) 0.99 (95% CI, 0.88; 1.12), nor specifically viral infections, IRR 0.87 (95% CI, 0.63; 1.19), in relatives of recipients with CMV compared to relatives of recipients without CMV. Also, no difference was seen in analyses stratified by transplant type, family relation and CMV serostatus. The risk of hospitalisation due to infection is not increased among first-degree relatives of transplant recipients with CMV infection compared to relatives of recipients without CMV.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology
Volume36
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)2391-2398
Number of pages7
ISSN0934-9723
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 51694119