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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Risk factors for hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection

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Background: The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors for hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in Danish children. Methods: This is a population-based cohort study with follow-up till 24 months of age. A total of 421,943 Danish children were divided into 5 groups based on gestational age (23-32, 33-35, 36, 37-41 and 42-45 weeks). Results: In adjusted Cox regression models, chronic disease, asthma hospitalization before the RSV infection and siblings were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for RSV infection in all children independent of gestational age. Plurality was associated with a decreased risk in children born between 23 and 36 weeks of gestation, whereas young maternal age, maternal asthma, single parenthood, maternal smoking, being born small for gestational age, Caesarian section, male gender and day care were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for RSV infection in term children. In postterm children, young maternal age, male sex, being born small for gestational age and maternal smoking were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for RSV. Asthma hospitalization before the RSV infection and siblings were associated with the highest measures of increased risk of hospitalization for RSV infection independent of gestational age. Conclusions: By 5 groups of gestational age, we provide estimates of the effects of 12 different factors, which can be regarded as add-on risk factors to those already known to increase the risk of hospitalization for RSV infection. Our study may help clinicians to precisely assess the risk profile in the individual child.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume35
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)61-65
Number of pages5
ISSN0891-3668
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Research areas

  • children, hospitalization, respiratory syncytial virus, risk factors

ID: 55077600