Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Reproducibility of Glucose Fluctuations Induced by Moderate Intensity Cycling Exercise in Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{dbfae5bcc6c945edbcd95448b47d14e0,
title = "Reproducibility of Glucose Fluctuations Induced by Moderate Intensity Cycling Exercise in Persons with Type 1 Diabetes",
abstract = "Aims: The purpose was to assess the reproducibility of glucose changes during three sessions of standardized moderate intensity continuous training of cycling on an individual level in people with type 1 diabetes.Methods: Twelve adults (six females) with type 1 diabetes performed three test sessions on an ergometer bicycle (30 min, 67% of predicted heart rate) on three different days. The participants were 36.5 (26.6-45.5) (median, IQR) years old, and their HbA1c was 65 ± 15 mmol/mol (mean ± SD). Two hours before the tests, the participants had a standard meal. Interstitial glucose (IG) and capillary glucose (CG) were measured using an iPro2 Medtronic continuous glucose monitor and the Bayer Contour XT-device, respectively. Prior to the test sessions, resting heart rate was measured using a digital blood pressure monitor to estimate the desired intensity of the exercise.Results: The average within-participant relationship between the average slope in glucose during sessions 2 and 1 was in IG -0.29 (95% CI -1.11; 0.58) and in CG -0.04 (-0.68; 0.77). Between sessions 3 and 2, IG is 0.18 (-0.27; 0.64) and in CG 0.13 (-0.25; 0.55). Between sessions 3 and 1, IG was 0.06 (-0.57; 0.71) and in CG 0.06 (-0.39; 0.52). The results indicate low reproducibility at participant levels and remained unchanged after adjustment for baseline glucose values.Conclusion: On an individual level, the glucose declines during three standardized sessions of PA were not associated with identical responses of the measured IG and CG levels. An overall anticipated decline of glucose concentrations was found in the moderate intensity cycling sessions. This highlights the importance of regular CG measurements during and after physical activity and awareness towards potential exercise-induced hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes.",
author = "Notkin, {Gabriel Tafdrup} and Kristensen, {Peter Lommer} and Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard and Jensen, {Andreas Kryger} and Stig Molsted",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Gabriel Tafdrup Notkin et al.",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1155/2021/6640600",
language = "English",
volume = "2021",
pages = "6640600",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes Research",
issn = "2314-6745",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reproducibility of Glucose Fluctuations Induced by Moderate Intensity Cycling Exercise in Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

AU - Notkin, Gabriel Tafdrup

AU - Kristensen, Peter Lommer

AU - Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

AU - Jensen, Andreas Kryger

AU - Molsted, Stig

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Gabriel Tafdrup Notkin et al.

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - Aims: The purpose was to assess the reproducibility of glucose changes during three sessions of standardized moderate intensity continuous training of cycling on an individual level in people with type 1 diabetes.Methods: Twelve adults (six females) with type 1 diabetes performed three test sessions on an ergometer bicycle (30 min, 67% of predicted heart rate) on three different days. The participants were 36.5 (26.6-45.5) (median, IQR) years old, and their HbA1c was 65 ± 15 mmol/mol (mean ± SD). Two hours before the tests, the participants had a standard meal. Interstitial glucose (IG) and capillary glucose (CG) were measured using an iPro2 Medtronic continuous glucose monitor and the Bayer Contour XT-device, respectively. Prior to the test sessions, resting heart rate was measured using a digital blood pressure monitor to estimate the desired intensity of the exercise.Results: The average within-participant relationship between the average slope in glucose during sessions 2 and 1 was in IG -0.29 (95% CI -1.11; 0.58) and in CG -0.04 (-0.68; 0.77). Between sessions 3 and 2, IG is 0.18 (-0.27; 0.64) and in CG 0.13 (-0.25; 0.55). Between sessions 3 and 1, IG was 0.06 (-0.57; 0.71) and in CG 0.06 (-0.39; 0.52). The results indicate low reproducibility at participant levels and remained unchanged after adjustment for baseline glucose values.Conclusion: On an individual level, the glucose declines during three standardized sessions of PA were not associated with identical responses of the measured IG and CG levels. An overall anticipated decline of glucose concentrations was found in the moderate intensity cycling sessions. This highlights the importance of regular CG measurements during and after physical activity and awareness towards potential exercise-induced hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes.

AB - Aims: The purpose was to assess the reproducibility of glucose changes during three sessions of standardized moderate intensity continuous training of cycling on an individual level in people with type 1 diabetes.Methods: Twelve adults (six females) with type 1 diabetes performed three test sessions on an ergometer bicycle (30 min, 67% of predicted heart rate) on three different days. The participants were 36.5 (26.6-45.5) (median, IQR) years old, and their HbA1c was 65 ± 15 mmol/mol (mean ± SD). Two hours before the tests, the participants had a standard meal. Interstitial glucose (IG) and capillary glucose (CG) were measured using an iPro2 Medtronic continuous glucose monitor and the Bayer Contour XT-device, respectively. Prior to the test sessions, resting heart rate was measured using a digital blood pressure monitor to estimate the desired intensity of the exercise.Results: The average within-participant relationship between the average slope in glucose during sessions 2 and 1 was in IG -0.29 (95% CI -1.11; 0.58) and in CG -0.04 (-0.68; 0.77). Between sessions 3 and 2, IG is 0.18 (-0.27; 0.64) and in CG 0.13 (-0.25; 0.55). Between sessions 3 and 1, IG was 0.06 (-0.57; 0.71) and in CG 0.06 (-0.39; 0.52). The results indicate low reproducibility at participant levels and remained unchanged after adjustment for baseline glucose values.Conclusion: On an individual level, the glucose declines during three standardized sessions of PA were not associated with identical responses of the measured IG and CG levels. An overall anticipated decline of glucose concentrations was found in the moderate intensity cycling sessions. This highlights the importance of regular CG measurements during and after physical activity and awareness towards potential exercise-induced hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85104421525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2021/6640600

DO - 10.1155/2021/6640600

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33860058

VL - 2021

SP - 6640600

JO - Journal of Diabetes Research

JF - Journal of Diabetes Research

SN - 2314-6745

M1 - 6640600

ER -

ID: 66258579