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Relation between leg extension power and 30-s sit-to-stand muscle power in older adults: validation and translation to functional performance

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This study aimed to assess the validity and functional relevance of a standardized procedure to assess lower limb muscle power by means of the 30-s sit-to-stand (STS) test when compared to leg extension power (LEP), traditional STS performance and handgrip strength. A total of 628 community-dwelling older subjects (60-93 years) from the Copenhagen Sarcopenia Study were included. Physical performance was assessed by the 30-s STS and 10-m maximal gait speed tests. Handgrip strength and LEP were recorded by a hand-held dynamometer and the Nottingham power rig, respectively. STS muscle power was calculated using the subjects' body mass and height, chair height and the number of repetitions completed in the 30-s STS test. We found a small albeit significant difference between LEP and unilateral STS power in older men (245.5 ± 88.8 vs. 223.4 ± 81.4 W; ES = 0.26; p < 0.05), but not in older women (135.9 ± 51.9 vs. 138.5 ± 49.6 W; ES = 0.05; p > 0.05). Notably, a large positive correlation was observed between both measures (r = 0.75; p < 0.001). Relative STS power was more strongly related with maximal gait speed than handgrip strength, repetition-based STS performance and relative LEP after adjusting for age (r = 0.53 vs 0.35-0.45; p < 0.05). In conclusion, STS power obtained from the 30-s STS test appeared to provide a valid measure of bilateral lower limb power and was more strongly related with physical performance than maximal handgrip strength, repetition-based STS performance and LEP.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16337
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)16337
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2020

    Research areas

  • Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging/physiology, Exercise Test, Female, Geriatric Assessment, Hand Strength/physiology, Humans, Leg/physiology, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Strength/physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Physical Functional Performance, Posture/physiology

ID: 61664137