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Recurrence rates after abdominal and vaginal cerclages in women with cervical insufficiency: a validated cohort study

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PURPOSE: To estimate the incidence of cervical insufficiency and compare recurrence rates of second trimester miscarriage/delivery in second and third pregnancies after prophylactic vaginal cerclage, abdominal cerclage, or no cerclage.

METHODS: Retrospective chart review of a representative register-based sample of 621 women with a spontaneous second trimester miscarriage/delivery in the first pregnancy in Denmark (1997-2012). We used strict criteria for the diagnosis of cervical insufficiency. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies was described by treatment with prophylactic vaginal cerclage, abdominal cerclage, or no prophylactic cerclage. Women were followed until June 2015.

RESULTS: Of 621 women, 149 (24%) fulfilled the strict criteria of cervical insufficiency. Prophylactic treatment with abdominal cerclage (n = 20), vaginal cerclage (n = 59), and no prophylactic cerclage (n = 61) resulted in a second pregnancy ending before 28 weeks in 5, 30, and 72% (p < 0.001) and before 34 weeks in 10, 46, and 84% (p < 0.001), respectively. Take-home baby rate was 95% after abdominal cerclage, 73% after vaginal cerclage, and 33% after no cerclage. In a third pregnancy, abdominal cerclage (n = 47), vaginal cerclage (n = 38), and no cerclage (n = 8) resulted in pregnancy ending before 34 weeks of gestation in 2, 21, and 25%, respectively (p = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Cervical insufficiency was diagnosed in 24% of women with an initial second trimester spontaneous miscarriage/delivery. In second and third pregnancies, recurrence rates were significantly lower after prophylactic vaginal or abdominal cerclage compared with no cerclage.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume295
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)859-866
Number of pages8
ISSN0932-0067
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

    Research areas

  • Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Cerclage, Cervical, Denmark, Female, Humans, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Uterine Cervical Incompetence, Journal Article
  • Health Sciences

ID: 52543888