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Recall of severe hypoglycaemia and self-estimated state of awareness in type 1 diabetes

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@article{008897f46b394db8ac8ae6b50691ea89,
title = "Recall of severe hypoglycaemia and self-estimated state of awareness in type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The ability of people with insulin-treated diabetes to remember severe hypoglycaemia and the consistency of their self-estimated awareness of hypoglycaemia are not well documented but are important in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to assess recall of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate the feasibility of a simple method for clinical classification of the awareness of hypoglycaemia.METHODS: A one-year prospective study was performed on a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 230). The rate of severe hypoglycaemia reported retrospectively at the end of the study was compared to the prospectively recorded rate during the study period. Self-estimated awareness was explored in questionnaires at baseline and at the end, and assessments were evaluated by the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes.RESULTS: Almost 90% of the participants correctly recalled whether they had had severe hypoglycaemia. However, those with high prospectively recorded numbers had incomplete recall, resulting in a 15% underestimation of the overall rate. On the basis of the answer to the question {"}Do you recognise symptoms when you have a hypo?{"}, the population was classified into three groups: 40% with normal awareness, 47% with impaired awareness and 13% with unawareness. The groups with impaired awareness and unawareness had 5.1 and 9.6 times higher rates of severe hypoglycaemia, respectively, compared to the group with normal awareness (p < 0.001).CONCLUSION: People with type 1 diabetes generally remember severe hypoglycaemic episodes during a one-year period. A simple method is proposed for classifying the state of awareness of hypoglycaemia in clinical practice.",
keywords = "Age of Onset, Awareness, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Male, Memory, Middle Aged, Outpatients, Prospective Studies, Records as Topic, Regression Analysis, Surveys and Questionnaires, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard and Stig Pramming and Birger Thorsteinsson",
note = "Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",
year = "2003",
month = jun,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1002/dmrr.377",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "232--40",
journal = "Diabetes - Metabolism: Research and Reviews",
issn = "1520-7552",
publisher = "John/Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recall of severe hypoglycaemia and self-estimated state of awareness in type 1 diabetes

AU - Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

AU - Pramming, Stig

AU - Thorsteinsson, Birger

N1 - Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PY - 2003/6/6

Y1 - 2003/6/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: The ability of people with insulin-treated diabetes to remember severe hypoglycaemia and the consistency of their self-estimated awareness of hypoglycaemia are not well documented but are important in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to assess recall of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate the feasibility of a simple method for clinical classification of the awareness of hypoglycaemia.METHODS: A one-year prospective study was performed on a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 230). The rate of severe hypoglycaemia reported retrospectively at the end of the study was compared to the prospectively recorded rate during the study period. Self-estimated awareness was explored in questionnaires at baseline and at the end, and assessments were evaluated by the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes.RESULTS: Almost 90% of the participants correctly recalled whether they had had severe hypoglycaemia. However, those with high prospectively recorded numbers had incomplete recall, resulting in a 15% underestimation of the overall rate. On the basis of the answer to the question "Do you recognise symptoms when you have a hypo?", the population was classified into three groups: 40% with normal awareness, 47% with impaired awareness and 13% with unawareness. The groups with impaired awareness and unawareness had 5.1 and 9.6 times higher rates of severe hypoglycaemia, respectively, compared to the group with normal awareness (p < 0.001).CONCLUSION: People with type 1 diabetes generally remember severe hypoglycaemic episodes during a one-year period. A simple method is proposed for classifying the state of awareness of hypoglycaemia in clinical practice.

AB - BACKGROUND: The ability of people with insulin-treated diabetes to remember severe hypoglycaemia and the consistency of their self-estimated awareness of hypoglycaemia are not well documented but are important in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to assess recall of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate the feasibility of a simple method for clinical classification of the awareness of hypoglycaemia.METHODS: A one-year prospective study was performed on a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 230). The rate of severe hypoglycaemia reported retrospectively at the end of the study was compared to the prospectively recorded rate during the study period. Self-estimated awareness was explored in questionnaires at baseline and at the end, and assessments were evaluated by the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes.RESULTS: Almost 90% of the participants correctly recalled whether they had had severe hypoglycaemia. However, those with high prospectively recorded numbers had incomplete recall, resulting in a 15% underestimation of the overall rate. On the basis of the answer to the question "Do you recognise symptoms when you have a hypo?", the population was classified into three groups: 40% with normal awareness, 47% with impaired awareness and 13% with unawareness. The groups with impaired awareness and unawareness had 5.1 and 9.6 times higher rates of severe hypoglycaemia, respectively, compared to the group with normal awareness (p < 0.001).CONCLUSION: People with type 1 diabetes generally remember severe hypoglycaemic episodes during a one-year period. A simple method is proposed for classifying the state of awareness of hypoglycaemia in clinical practice.

KW - Age of Onset

KW - Awareness

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Hypoglycemia

KW - Male

KW - Memory

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Outpatients

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Records as Topic

KW - Regression Analysis

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1002/dmrr.377

DO - 10.1002/dmrr.377

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 12789657

VL - 19

SP - 232

EP - 240

JO - Diabetes - Metabolism: Research and Reviews

JF - Diabetes - Metabolism: Research and Reviews

SN - 1520-7552

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 51548519