Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Recall of severe hypoglycaemia and self-estimated state of awareness in type 1 diabetes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. EDUCATION PROGRAMMES FOR PERSONS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES USING AN INSULIN PUMP: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Treatment of modifiable risk factors for foot ulceration in persons with diabetes: a systematic review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Guidelines on the prevention of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes (IWGDF 2019 update)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Glucose homeostasis in statin users-The LIFESTAT study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Oral insulin does not alter gut microbiota composition of NOD mice

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Does nocturnal hypoglycaemia really improve quality of life? Reply to Søholm U, Broadley MM, Choudhary P et al [letter]

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. Acute hypoglycemia and risk of cardiac arrhythmias in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and controls

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. EDUCATION PROGRAMMES FOR PERSONS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES USING AN INSULIN PUMP: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Cold-induced dishabituation in rodents exposed to recurrent hypoglycaemia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: The ability of people with insulin-treated diabetes to remember severe hypoglycaemia and the consistency of their self-estimated awareness of hypoglycaemia are not well documented but are important in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to assess recall of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate the feasibility of a simple method for clinical classification of the awareness of hypoglycaemia.

METHODS: A one-year prospective study was performed on a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 230). The rate of severe hypoglycaemia reported retrospectively at the end of the study was compared to the prospectively recorded rate during the study period. Self-estimated awareness was explored in questionnaires at baseline and at the end, and assessments were evaluated by the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes.

RESULTS: Almost 90% of the participants correctly recalled whether they had had severe hypoglycaemia. However, those with high prospectively recorded numbers had incomplete recall, resulting in a 15% underestimation of the overall rate. On the basis of the answer to the question "Do you recognise symptoms when you have a hypo?", the population was classified into three groups: 40% with normal awareness, 47% with impaired awareness and 13% with unawareness. The groups with impaired awareness and unawareness had 5.1 and 9.6 times higher rates of severe hypoglycaemia, respectively, compared to the group with normal awareness (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: People with type 1 diabetes generally remember severe hypoglycaemic episodes during a one-year period. A simple method is proposed for classifying the state of awareness of hypoglycaemia in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes - Metabolism: Research and Reviews (Print Edition)
Volume19
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)232-40
Number of pages9
ISSN1520-7552
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2003

    Research areas

  • Age of Onset, Awareness, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Male, Memory, Middle Aged, Outpatients, Prospective Studies, Records as Topic, Regression Analysis, Surveys and Questionnaires, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 51548519