Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Rapid dispatch for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with improved survival

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Repolarization and ventricular arrhythmia during targeted temperature management post cardiac arrest

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Resuscitation Academy as a continuous program to save lives in Europe

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  4. Measure to improve - and more to be done

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

  5. Bystander interventions and survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at Copenhagen International Airport

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor for all-comers with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Workforce Attachment after Ischemic Stroke – The Importance of Time to Thrombolytic Therapy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Assessment of breathing in cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial of three teaching methods among laypersons

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

AIM: As proxy for initiation of the first link in the Chain of Survival by the dispatcher, we aimed to investigate the effect of time to first dispatch on 30-day survival among patients with OHCA ultimately receiving the highest-level emergency medical response.

METHODS: We linked data on all OHCA unwitnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) treated by Copenhagen EMS from 2016 through 2018 to corresponding emergency call records. Among patients receiving highest priority emergency response, we calculated time to dispatch as time from start of call to time of first dispatch.

RESULTS: We included 3548 patients with OHCA. Of these, 94.1% received the highest priority response (median time to dispatch 0.84 min, 25th-75th percentile 0.58-1.24 min). Patients with time to dispatch within one minute compared to three or more minutes were more likely to receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (77.3 vs 54.2%), bystander defibrillation (11.5 vs 6.5%) and defibrillation by emergency medical services (24.1 vs 7.5%) and were 2.6-fold more likely to survive 30 days after the OHCA (P = 0.004). Results from multivariate logistic regression were similar: odds ratio (OR) of survival 0.83 per minute increase (95% confidence interval 0.70-1.00, P = 0.04). However, survival was similar between those who received highest priority response and those who did not: OR of survival 0.88 (95% confidence interval 0.53-1.46, P = 0.61).

CONCLUSION: Rapid time to dispatch among patients with highest priority response was significantly associated with a higher probability of 30-day survival following OHCA.

Original languageEnglish
JournalResuscitation
Volume163
Pages (from-to)176-183
Number of pages8
ISSN0300-9572
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

    Research areas

  • Automated external defibrillators, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Emergency medical dispatch, Emergency medical response, Emergency medical services, Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, Public health, Time to dispatch

ID: 65622070