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Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014

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Harvard

Moeller, S, Hansen, CM, Kragholm, K, Dupre, ME, Sasson, C, Pearson, DA, Tyson, C, Jollis, JG, Monk, L, Starks, MA, McNally, B, Thomas, KL, Becker, L, Torp-Pedersen, C & Granger, CB 2021, 'Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014', Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 10, no. 17, e019082, pp. e019082. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.019082

APA

Moeller, S., Hansen, C. M., Kragholm, K., Dupre, M. E., Sasson, C., Pearson, D. A., Tyson, C., Jollis, J. G., Monk, L., Starks, M. A., McNally, B., Thomas, K. L., Becker, L., Torp-Pedersen, C., & Granger, C. B. (2021). Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014. Journal of the American Heart Association, 10(17), e019082. [e019082]. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.019082

CBE

Moeller S, Hansen CM, Kragholm K, Dupre ME, Sasson C, Pearson DA, Tyson C, Jollis JG, Monk L, Starks MA, McNally B, Thomas KL, Becker L, Torp-Pedersen C, Granger CB. 2021. Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014. Journal of the American Heart Association. 10(17):e019082. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.019082

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Moeller, Sidsel ; Hansen, Carolina M ; Kragholm, Kristian ; Dupre, Matt E ; Sasson, Comilla ; Pearson, David A ; Tyson, Clark ; Jollis, James G ; Monk, Lisa ; Starks, Monique A ; McNally, Bryan ; Thomas, Kevin L ; Becker, Lance ; Torp-Pedersen, Christian ; Granger, Christopher B. / Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2021 ; Vol. 10, No. 17. pp. e019082.

Bibtex

@article{2969a8ef443a48be847578ef3fe6cb75,
title = "Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014",
abstract = "Background Following the implementation of the HeartRescue project, with interventions in the community, emergency medical services, and hospitals to improve care and outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in North Carolina, improved bystander and first responder treatments as well as survival were observed. This study aimed to determine whether these improvements were consistent across Black versus White individuals. Methods and Results Using the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES), we identified OHCA from 16 counties in North Carolina (population 3 million) from 2010 to 2014. Temporal changes in interventions and outcomes were assessed using multilevel multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for patient and socioeconomic neighborhood-level factors. Of 7091 patients with OHCA, 36.5% were Black and 63.5% were White. Black patients were younger, more females, had more unwitnessed arrests and non-shockable rhythm (Black: 81.0%; White: 75.4%). From 2010 to 2014, the adjusted probabilities of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) went from 38.5% to 51.2% in White, P<0.001; and 36.9% to 45.6% in Black, P=0.002, and first-responder defibrillation went from 13.2% to 17.2% in White, P=0.002; and 14.7% to 17.3% in Black, P=0.16. From 2010 to 2014, survival to discharge only increased in White (8.0% to 11.4%, P=0.004; Black 8.9% to 9.5%, P=0.60), though, in shockable patients the probability of survival to discharge went from 24.8% to 34.6% in White, P=0.02; and 21.7% to 29.0% in Black, P=0. 10. Conclusions After the HeartRescue program, bystander CPR and first-responder defibrillation increased in both patient groups; however, survival only increased significantly for White patients.",
author = "Sidsel Moeller and Hansen, {Carolina M} and Kristian Kragholm and Dupre, {Matt E} and Comilla Sasson and Pearson, {David A} and Clark Tyson and Jollis, {James G} and Lisa Monk and Starks, {Monique A} and Bryan McNally and Thomas, {Kevin L} and Lance Becker and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Granger, {Christopher B}",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1161/JAHA.120.019082",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "e019082",
journal = "Journal of the American Heart Association",
issn = "2047-9980",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "17",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Race Differences in Interventions and Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010 to 2014

AU - Moeller, Sidsel

AU - Hansen, Carolina M

AU - Kragholm, Kristian

AU - Dupre, Matt E

AU - Sasson, Comilla

AU - Pearson, David A

AU - Tyson, Clark

AU - Jollis, James G

AU - Monk, Lisa

AU - Starks, Monique A

AU - McNally, Bryan

AU - Thomas, Kevin L

AU - Becker, Lance

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Granger, Christopher B

PY - 2021/9/7

Y1 - 2021/9/7

N2 - Background Following the implementation of the HeartRescue project, with interventions in the community, emergency medical services, and hospitals to improve care and outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in North Carolina, improved bystander and first responder treatments as well as survival were observed. This study aimed to determine whether these improvements were consistent across Black versus White individuals. Methods and Results Using the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES), we identified OHCA from 16 counties in North Carolina (population 3 million) from 2010 to 2014. Temporal changes in interventions and outcomes were assessed using multilevel multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for patient and socioeconomic neighborhood-level factors. Of 7091 patients with OHCA, 36.5% were Black and 63.5% were White. Black patients were younger, more females, had more unwitnessed arrests and non-shockable rhythm (Black: 81.0%; White: 75.4%). From 2010 to 2014, the adjusted probabilities of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) went from 38.5% to 51.2% in White, P<0.001; and 36.9% to 45.6% in Black, P=0.002, and first-responder defibrillation went from 13.2% to 17.2% in White, P=0.002; and 14.7% to 17.3% in Black, P=0.16. From 2010 to 2014, survival to discharge only increased in White (8.0% to 11.4%, P=0.004; Black 8.9% to 9.5%, P=0.60), though, in shockable patients the probability of survival to discharge went from 24.8% to 34.6% in White, P=0.02; and 21.7% to 29.0% in Black, P=0. 10. Conclusions After the HeartRescue program, bystander CPR and first-responder defibrillation increased in both patient groups; however, survival only increased significantly for White patients.

AB - Background Following the implementation of the HeartRescue project, with interventions in the community, emergency medical services, and hospitals to improve care and outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in North Carolina, improved bystander and first responder treatments as well as survival were observed. This study aimed to determine whether these improvements were consistent across Black versus White individuals. Methods and Results Using the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES), we identified OHCA from 16 counties in North Carolina (population 3 million) from 2010 to 2014. Temporal changes in interventions and outcomes were assessed using multilevel multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for patient and socioeconomic neighborhood-level factors. Of 7091 patients with OHCA, 36.5% were Black and 63.5% were White. Black patients were younger, more females, had more unwitnessed arrests and non-shockable rhythm (Black: 81.0%; White: 75.4%). From 2010 to 2014, the adjusted probabilities of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) went from 38.5% to 51.2% in White, P<0.001; and 36.9% to 45.6% in Black, P=0.002, and first-responder defibrillation went from 13.2% to 17.2% in White, P=0.002; and 14.7% to 17.3% in Black, P=0.16. From 2010 to 2014, survival to discharge only increased in White (8.0% to 11.4%, P=0.004; Black 8.9% to 9.5%, P=0.60), though, in shockable patients the probability of survival to discharge went from 24.8% to 34.6% in White, P=0.02; and 21.7% to 29.0% in Black, P=0. 10. Conclusions After the HeartRescue program, bystander CPR and first-responder defibrillation increased in both patient groups; however, survival only increased significantly for White patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85115207698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/JAHA.120.019082

DO - 10.1161/JAHA.120.019082

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34431375

VL - 10

SP - e019082

JO - Journal of the American Heart Association

JF - Journal of the American Heart Association

SN - 2047-9980

IS - 17

M1 - e019082

ER -

ID: 68135493