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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Quantitative Measurements of Motor Function in Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Dementia with Lewy Bodies: A Proof-of-Concept Study

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BACKGROUND: This study examines the efficacy of using quantitative measurements of motor dysfunction, compared to clinical ratings, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB).

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 49 patients with a diagnosis of AD (n = 17), FTD (n = 19), or DLB (n = 13) were included and underwent cognitive testing, clinical motor evaluation, and quantitative motor tests: pronation/supination hand tapping, grasping and lifting, and finger and foot tapping.

RESULTS: Our results revealed significantly higher Q-Motor values in pronation/supination and in grip lift force assessment in AD, FTD, and DLB compared to healthy controls (HC). Q-Motor values detected significant differences between AD and HC, while clinical ratings did not.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that quantitative measurements provide more objective and sensitive measurements of motor dysfunction in dementia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume46
Issue number3-4
Pages (from-to)168-179
Number of pages12
ISSN1420-8008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Sep 2018

ID: 55493159