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Quantitative analysis of absorption, metabolism, and excretion of benzoxazinoids in humans after the consumption of high- and low-benzoxazinoid diets with similar contents of cereal dietary fibres: a crossover study

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PURPOSE: Benzoxazinoids (BXs) are a group of wholegrain phytochemicals with potential pharmacological properties; however, limited information exists on their absorption, metabolism, and excretion in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-dependent uptake and excretion of dietary BXs in a healthy population.

METHODS: Blood and urine were collected from 19 healthy participants from a crossover study after a washout, a LOW BX diet or HIGH BX diet, and analysed for 12 BXs and 4 phenoxazinone derivatives.

RESULTS: We found that the plasma BX level peaked approximately 3 h after food intake, whereas BXs in urine were present even at 36 h after consuming a meal. No phenoxazinone derivatives could be detected in either plasma or urine. The dominant BX metabolite in both plasma and urine was 2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (HBOA-Glc), even though 2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA-Glc) was the major component in the diet.

CONCLUSION: The dietary BX treatment correlated well with the plasma and urine levels, illustrating strong dose-dependent BX absorption, which also had a rapid washout, especially from the plasma compartment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
ISSN1436-6207
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Oct 2015

ID: 45762650