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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Quality of Life is Markedly Impaired by Rheumatological and Skin Manifestations in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Questionnaire Survey

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INTRODUCTION: To estimate lifetime prevalence of diabetes-related upper limb and non-acquired skin manifestations in a representative type 1 diabetes (T1D) population and to identify associations between these conditions and quality of life.

METHODS: A questionnaire on these complications and measures of quality of life (World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index [WHO-5]), depression, and diabetes-specific burden (Problem Areas in Diabetes [PAID] scale) was sent to all T1D patients in a Danish clinic (N = 583).

RESULTS: The response rate was 68.6%. Lifetime prevalence of any upper limb soft tissue lesion was 72%; prevalence of any skin lesion was 10.5%. Frozen shoulder and vitiligo were most common upper limb and skin manifestation, at a prevalence of 53 and 9.1%, respectively. Compared to patients with no skin lesion, those with at least one skin lesion had more depression (19 vs. 33%; P < 0.01) and lower WHO-5 scores. Frozen shoulder was associated with lower WHO-5 scores (P < 0.001), more depression (29 vs. 14%; P < 0.001), and a higher PAID score (P < 0.01). A diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was associated with lower WHO-5 scores (P < 0.001), a higher risk of depression (29 vs. 16%; P < 0.01), and a higher PAID score (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Upper limb soft tissue lesions and diabetes-specific non-acquired skin lesions are very common in patients with T1D and strongly associated with impaired life quality and increased risk of depression.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes Therapy
Volume10
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)635-647
Number of pages13
ISSN1869-6953
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

    Research areas

  • Depression, Non-acquired skin lesions, PAID, Quality of life, Rheumatological manifestations, Type 1 diabetes

ID: 56600225