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Prospective association between late evening food consumption and risk of prediabetes and diabetes: the Whitehall II cohort study

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Aims: We examined whether late evening food consumption was prospectively associated with the risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes in a large observational study of individuals with normoglycaemia. Methods: Participants were 2642 men and women with normoglycaemia (HbA 1c < 39 mmol/mol; < 5.7%) from the Whitehall II study. Time of last eating episode (TLEE) before the examination day was assessed at baseline. We studied the associations of TLEE with 5-year changes in HbA 1c and risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes (HbA 1c ≥ 39 mmol/mol; ≥ 5.7%). Potential heterogeneity in the association between TLEE and prediabetes or diabetes was examined using recursive partitioning modelling for time-to-event outcomes. Results: There was a tendency of an overall association of TLEE with change in HbA 1c but with little effect size [β per 1-h increase in TLEE = 0.2 mmol/mol, 95% CI −0.0 to 0.3 (0.01%, −0.00 to 0.03); P = 0.055] and no association with the risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes (risk ratio per 1-h increase in TLEE = 1.03, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.13; P = 0.511). According to the recursive partitioning modelling, women with HbA 1c ≤ 36 mmol/mol and TLEE after 21:00 had a 1.51 times (95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) higher 5-year risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes than those having their TLEE between 16:00 and 21:00 (35.4% vs. 23.5%; P = 0.003). Conclusions: There was no overall association of TLEE with the development of prediabetes or diabetes in the Whitehall II population. However, explorative analyses suggested that eating late in the evening was associated with increased risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes among women with good glycaemic control. Whether restricting late evening food consumption is effective and feasible for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes needs testing in randomized controlled trials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetic Medicine Online
Volume36
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)1256-1260
Number of pages5
ISSN1464-5491
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

ID: 57062514