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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Promising results from a residential rehabilitation intervention focused on fatigue and the secondary psychological and physical consequences of cardiac arrest: The SCARF feasibility study

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  • Vicky L Joshi
  • Lars Hermann Tang
  • Young Joo Kim
  • Mette Kirstine Wagner
  • Jørgen Feldbæk Nielsen
  • Morten Tjoernlund
  • Ann-Dorthe Zwisler
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AIMS: This study investigated the feasibility and potential effect of SCARF (Survivors of Cardiac ARest focused on Fatigue) a multidisciplinary residential rehabilitation intervention focused on fatigue and the secondary psychological and physical consequences of cardiac arrest (CA).

METHODS: This was a prospective one-armed feasibility study. Six progression criteria were identified related to the feasibility of the intervention and viability of a future effect study in terms of: participant recruitment (1), participant retention (2,3,4), and completeness of outcomes (5,6). Data on participant/clinician satisfaction with the intervention was also collected along with self-reported outcomes: fatigue, quality of life, anxiety, depression, function and disability, and physical activity (at baseline, 12 weeks and 6 months) and physical capacity (baseline and 12 weeks).

RESULTS: Four progression criteria were met including retention (87.5%) and completion of baseline outcomes (97.5%). Two criteria were not met: recruitment rate was 2.9 participants per month (estimated rate needed 6.1) and completion of final outcomes was 65% (estimated proportion needed 75%). Participant/clinician satisfaction with the intervention was high. Three months after the SCARF intervention small to moderate effect size changes of r = 0.18-0.46 were found for self-reported fatigue, quality of life, anxiety, depression, function and disability and for two of the physical capacity tests (d = 0.46-0.52).

CONCLUSION: SCARF was found to be a feasible intervention with high participant/clinician satisfaction, high participant retention and the possible potential to improve self-reported and physical capacity outcomes. Procedures for study recruitment and collection of final outcomes should be modified before a fully powered randomised controlled trial is conducted.

Original languageEnglish
JournalResuscitation
Volume173
Pages (from-to)12-22
Number of pages11
ISSN0300-9572
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • Fatigue/etiology, Feasibility Studies, Heart Arrest/therapy, Humans, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life

ID: 79808072