Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Procedure-related pain in children in a Danish University Hospital. A qualitative study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Response to comment 'Tsui, Ban; Tsui, Jenkin: ABC diaphragmatic evaluation for neonates'

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearch

  2. Essential ultrasound techniques of the pediatric airway

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Structured intervention for management of pain following day surgery in children

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. General Abdominal and Urologic Surgery

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterCommunication

  2. Pain prevalence in hospitalized children: a prospective cross-sectional survey in four Danish university hospitals

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Effect of clonidine to prevent agitation in children after sevoflurane anaesthesia: a randomised placebo controlled multicentre trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Children being cared for in hospital often undergo multiple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress may consequently place a significant burden on the children. Although standards for pain management exist, procedure-related pain remains inadequately treated.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and pain intensity of procedures in children, as well as the associated pharmacologic interventions to manage the pain in a Danish University Hospital.

METHODS: During a 3-month period in 2013, a structured questionnaire was used to prospectively record all procedures performed on children from 1 month to 18 years of age. Directly after the procedure, the pharmacologic pain management interventions and the pain intensity were recorded. Pain intensity was measured by using age-appropriate pain scales. Positioning and prior experience with the procedure were recorded.

RESULTS: Of the 316 children included in the study, 72% experienced none to mild pain, 8.5% experienced moderate to severe pain during the procedures, and 65% had a pharmacologic pain management intervention. Significant higher median VAS score was found during venipuncture in the children sitting on the lap of their parents compared with other positions (P < 0.05), and significant lower median VAS score was found in children who had experienced the procedure before (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Most children experienced mild pain during procedures. The children's positioning during the procedure and prior experience with the procedure seem to influence their experience of procedural pain and it is therefore essential that therapy is tailored for each child and includes a multimodal approach.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPaediatric Anaesthesia
Volume24
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)602-7
Number of pages6
ISSN1155-5645
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

ID: 44335471