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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Price and sales volume of sugar-sweetened beverages, diet drinks, sweets and chocolates: analysis of Danish retail scanner data

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OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between price and sales volume of non-alcoholic sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), diet drinks, sweets and chocolates, including own and cross price elasticity to further quantify the potential impact of price.

METHODS: The study was based on retail scanner data for grocery sales from retail outlet chains in Denmark during the year 2008-2015. A fixed-effects model was used to estimate the association between price and sales volume, using own price and cross price elasticity.

RESULTS: Sales volume of all sugary products except for chocolates were significantly negatively associated with price. Own price elasticity varied from -0.3 to -0.4 for drinks and sweets indicating that a 10% increase in price would cause a reduction in sales by 3 or 4%. A 10% increase in price of carbonated SSBs would increase sales of diet drinks by 7%. Cross price elasticities for other products were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study demonstrated significant negative associations between changes in price and changes in the sale of SSBs, diet drinks and sweets.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume74
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)581-587
Number of pages7
ISSN0954-3007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

ID: 57783060