Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Prevalence of pre-cluster symptoms in episodic cluster headache: Is it possible to predict an upcoming bout?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Erenumab prevents the occurrence of migraine attacks and not just migraine days: Post-hoc analyses of a phase III study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Guidelines of the International Headache Society for clinical trials with neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Twenty-five years of triptans - a nationwide population study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Early treatment with sumatriptan prevents PACAP38-induced migraine: A randomised clinical trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Guidelines of the International Headache Society for clinical trials with neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Genetic Susceptibility Loci in Genomewide Association Study of Cluster Headache

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease: Overlapping Mechanisms

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting with progressive cognitive decline

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Early symptoms prior to a cluster headache bout have been reported to occur days or weeks before the actual beginning of the cluster headache bouts. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of pre-cluster (premonitory) symptoms and examine the predictability of an upcoming cluster headache bout.

METHODS: 100 patients with episodic cluster headache were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. All patients underwent a semi-structured interview including 25 questions concerning pre-cluster symptoms.

RESULTS: Pre-cluster symptoms were reported by 86% of patients with a mean of 6.8 days (interquartile range 3-14) preceding the bout. An ability to predict an upcoming bout was reported by 57% with a mean 4.6 days (interquartile range 2-7) before the bout. Occurrence of shadow attacks was associated with increased predictability (odds ratio: 3.06, confidence interval: 1.19-7.88, p-value = 0.020). In remission periods, 58% of patients reported mild cluster headache symptoms and 53% reported occurrence of single shadow attacks.

CONCLUSIONS: The majority of episodic cluster headache patients experienced pre-cluster symptoms, and more than half could predict an upcoming bout, suggesting the significant potential of early intervention. Furthermore, the experience of mild cluster headache symptoms and infrequent shadow attacks in remission periods is common and suggest an underlying pathophysiology extending beyond the cluster headache bouts.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCephalalgia
Volume41
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)799-809
Number of pages11
ISSN0333-1024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

    Research areas

  • bout predictability, out-of-bout symptoms, pathophysiology, Pre-cluster (premonitory) symptoms

ID: 61874767