Prevalence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism in liver transplant recipients and associated risk factors

Moises Alberto Suarez-Zdunek, Nicoline Stender Arentoft, Paul Suno Krohn, Emilie Høegholm Ernst Lauridsen, Shoaib Afzal, Julie Høgh, Magda Teresa Thomsen, Andreas Dehlbæk Knudsen, Børge Grønne Nordestgaard, Jens Georg Hillingsø, Gerda Elisabeth Villadsen, Peter Holland-Fischer, Allan Rasmussen, Anette Dam Fialla, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Susanne D Nielsen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Abstract

The prevalence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism and associated risk factors are unknown in liver transplant recipients. We aimed to determine the prevalence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism and associated risk factors in liver transplant recipients and to compare it with controls from the general population. As part of the Danish Comorbidity in Liver Transplant Recipients (DACOLT) Study, all Danish liver transplant recipients over the age of 20 were invited for measurements of concentrations of thyrotropin and thyroid hormones. The prevalence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism was compared to age- and sex-matched controls from the Copenhagen General Population Study. Using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and body-mass index, we investigated potential risk factors. We recruited 489 liver transplant recipients and 1808 controls. Among liver transplant recipients, 14 (2.9%) had hyperthyroidism compared with 21 (1.2%) of controls (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-4.75, P = 0.04), while 42 (5.7%) had hypothyroidism compared with 139 (7.7%) of controls (aOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.43-1.08, P = 0.10). Female sex, and autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis as causes of transplantation were associated with hyperthyroidism after adjustments. Age, female sex, and autoimmune liver diseases as cause of transplantation were associated with hypothyroidism after adjustments. DACOLT is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04777032).

Original languageEnglish
Article number7828
JournalScientific Reports
Volume14
Issue number1
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2024

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