Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and the impact on glycaemic control

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Biomarkers and Their Relation to Cardiac Function Late After Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Impact of Lean Body Mass and Insulin Sensitivity on the IGF-1-Bone Mass Axis in Adolescence: the EPICOM study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

AIMS: To study the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes compared with pregnant women without diabetes. Secondly, to explore whether anxiety and/or depression symptoms in early pregnancy have an impact on glycaemic control and gestational weight gain.

METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 90 consecutive singleton pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and 88 singleton pregnant women without diabetes. All women completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire in early and late pregnancy. A score ≥8 in the anxiety or the depression scale was used to define anxiety and/or depression symptoms.

RESULTS: Anxiety and/or depression symptoms were present in 40% of women with type 2 diabetes and 7% of women without diabetes in early pregnancy (Relative Risk=5.87 (95% Confidence Interval: 2.60-13.22). The figures were similar in late pregnancy. In women with type 2 diabetes and anxiety and/or depression symptoms in early pregnancy, HbA1c (mean±SD) was 52±14 vs. 49±11 mmol/mol (6.9±1.2 vs. 6.6±1.0%), p=0.31 in early pregnancy and 43±8 vs. 40±4 mmol/mol (6.1±0.7 vs. 5.8±0.4%), p=0.04 in late pregnancy compared with women without symptoms. Gestational weight gain was similar in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS: In women with type 2 diabetes, 40% had anxiety and/or depression symptoms in early pregnancy. Women with these symptoms obtained less optimal glycaemic control in late pregnancy but similar gestational weight gain as the remaining women.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14506
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume38
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)e14506
ISSN1464-5491
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

© 2020 Diabetes UK.

    Research areas

  • pregnancy, anxiety, depression, gestational weight gain, pregnancy outcome, type 2 diabetes

ID: 61613535