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Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States

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Frontera, JA, Lewis, A, Melmed, K, Lin, J, Kondziella, D, Helbok, R, Yaghi, S, Meropol, S, Wisniewski, T, Balcer, L & Galetta, SL 2021, 'Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 13, 690383, pp. 690383. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2021.690383

APA

Frontera, J. A., Lewis, A., Melmed, K., Lin, J., Kondziella, D., Helbok, R., Yaghi, S., Meropol, S., Wisniewski, T., Balcer, L., & Galetta, S. L. (2021). Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 13, 690383. [690383]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2021.690383

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Author

Frontera, Jennifer A ; Lewis, Ariane ; Melmed, Kara ; Lin, Jessica ; Kondziella, Daniel ; Helbok, Raimund ; Yaghi, Shadi ; Meropol, Sharon ; Wisniewski, Thomas ; Balcer, Laura ; Galetta, Steven L. / Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States. In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2021 ; Vol. 13. pp. 690383.

Bibtex

@article{3e1fbdeaf6ea48b9aa2e14145026aba7,
title = "Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States",
abstract = "Background/Objectives: Little is known regarding the prevalence and predictors of prolonged cognitive and psychological symptoms of COVID-19 among community-dwellers. We aimed to quantitatively measure self-reported metrics of fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep and identify factors associated with these metrics among United States residents with or without COVID-19.Methods: We solicited 1000 adult United States residents for an online survey conducted February 3-5, 2021 utilizing a commercial crowdsourcing community research platform. The platform curates eligible participants to approximate United States demographics by age, sex, and race proportions. COVID-19 was diagnosed by laboratory testing and/or by exposure to a known positive contact with subsequent typical symptoms. Prolonged COVID-19 was self-reported and coded for those with symptoms ≥ 1 month following initial diagnosis. The primary outcomes were NIH PROMIS/Neuro-QoL short-form T-scores for fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep compared among those with prolonged COVID-19 symptoms, COVID-19 without prolonged symptoms and COVID-19 negative subjects. Multivariable backwards step-wise logistic regression models were constructed to predict abnormal Neuro-QoL metrics.Results: Among 999 respondents, the average age was 45 years (range 18-84), 49% were male, 76 (7.6%) had a history of COVID-19 and 19/76 (25%) COVID-19 positive participants reported prolonged symptoms lasting a median of 4 months (range 1-13). Prolonged COVID-19 participants were more often younger, female, Hispanic, and had a history of depression/mood/thought disorder (all P < 0.05). They experienced significantly higher rates of unemployment and financial insecurity, and their symptoms created greater interference with work and household activities compared to other COVID-19 status groups (all P < 0.05). After adjusting for demographics, past medical history and stressor covariates in multivariable logistic regression analysis, COVID-19 status was independently predictive of worse Neuro-QoL cognitive dysfunction scores (adjusted OR 11.52, 95% CI 1.01-2.28, P = 0.047), but there were no significant differences in quantitative measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, or sleep.Conclusion: Prolonged symptoms occurred in 25% of COVID-19 positive participants, and NeuroQoL cognitive dysfunction scores were significantly worse among COVID-19 positive subjects, even after accounting for demographic and stressor covariates. Fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep scores did not differ between COVID-19 positive and negative respondents.",
keywords = "cognitive, Community Dwellers, COVID-19, long-hauler, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, stressors",
author = "Frontera, {Jennifer A} and Ariane Lewis and Kara Melmed and Jessica Lin and Daniel Kondziella and Raimund Helbok and Shadi Yaghi and Sharon Meropol and Thomas Wisniewski and Laura Balcer and Galetta, {Steven L}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Frontera, Lewis, Melmed, Lin, Kondziella, Helbok, Yaghi, Meropol, Wisniewski, Balcer and Galetta.",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.3389/fnagi.2021.690383",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "690383",
journal = "Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience",
issn = "1663-4365",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and Predictors of Prolonged Cognitive and Psychological Symptoms Following COVID-19 in the United States

AU - Frontera, Jennifer A

AU - Lewis, Ariane

AU - Melmed, Kara

AU - Lin, Jessica

AU - Kondziella, Daniel

AU - Helbok, Raimund

AU - Yaghi, Shadi

AU - Meropol, Sharon

AU - Wisniewski, Thomas

AU - Balcer, Laura

AU - Galetta, Steven L

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Frontera, Lewis, Melmed, Lin, Kondziella, Helbok, Yaghi, Meropol, Wisniewski, Balcer and Galetta.

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - Background/Objectives: Little is known regarding the prevalence and predictors of prolonged cognitive and psychological symptoms of COVID-19 among community-dwellers. We aimed to quantitatively measure self-reported metrics of fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep and identify factors associated with these metrics among United States residents with or without COVID-19.Methods: We solicited 1000 adult United States residents for an online survey conducted February 3-5, 2021 utilizing a commercial crowdsourcing community research platform. The platform curates eligible participants to approximate United States demographics by age, sex, and race proportions. COVID-19 was diagnosed by laboratory testing and/or by exposure to a known positive contact with subsequent typical symptoms. Prolonged COVID-19 was self-reported and coded for those with symptoms ≥ 1 month following initial diagnosis. The primary outcomes were NIH PROMIS/Neuro-QoL short-form T-scores for fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep compared among those with prolonged COVID-19 symptoms, COVID-19 without prolonged symptoms and COVID-19 negative subjects. Multivariable backwards step-wise logistic regression models were constructed to predict abnormal Neuro-QoL metrics.Results: Among 999 respondents, the average age was 45 years (range 18-84), 49% were male, 76 (7.6%) had a history of COVID-19 and 19/76 (25%) COVID-19 positive participants reported prolonged symptoms lasting a median of 4 months (range 1-13). Prolonged COVID-19 participants were more often younger, female, Hispanic, and had a history of depression/mood/thought disorder (all P < 0.05). They experienced significantly higher rates of unemployment and financial insecurity, and their symptoms created greater interference with work and household activities compared to other COVID-19 status groups (all P < 0.05). After adjusting for demographics, past medical history and stressor covariates in multivariable logistic regression analysis, COVID-19 status was independently predictive of worse Neuro-QoL cognitive dysfunction scores (adjusted OR 11.52, 95% CI 1.01-2.28, P = 0.047), but there were no significant differences in quantitative measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, or sleep.Conclusion: Prolonged symptoms occurred in 25% of COVID-19 positive participants, and NeuroQoL cognitive dysfunction scores were significantly worse among COVID-19 positive subjects, even after accounting for demographic and stressor covariates. Fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep scores did not differ between COVID-19 positive and negative respondents.

AB - Background/Objectives: Little is known regarding the prevalence and predictors of prolonged cognitive and psychological symptoms of COVID-19 among community-dwellers. We aimed to quantitatively measure self-reported metrics of fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep and identify factors associated with these metrics among United States residents with or without COVID-19.Methods: We solicited 1000 adult United States residents for an online survey conducted February 3-5, 2021 utilizing a commercial crowdsourcing community research platform. The platform curates eligible participants to approximate United States demographics by age, sex, and race proportions. COVID-19 was diagnosed by laboratory testing and/or by exposure to a known positive contact with subsequent typical symptoms. Prolonged COVID-19 was self-reported and coded for those with symptoms ≥ 1 month following initial diagnosis. The primary outcomes were NIH PROMIS/Neuro-QoL short-form T-scores for fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and sleep compared among those with prolonged COVID-19 symptoms, COVID-19 without prolonged symptoms and COVID-19 negative subjects. Multivariable backwards step-wise logistic regression models were constructed to predict abnormal Neuro-QoL metrics.Results: Among 999 respondents, the average age was 45 years (range 18-84), 49% were male, 76 (7.6%) had a history of COVID-19 and 19/76 (25%) COVID-19 positive participants reported prolonged symptoms lasting a median of 4 months (range 1-13). Prolonged COVID-19 participants were more often younger, female, Hispanic, and had a history of depression/mood/thought disorder (all P < 0.05). They experienced significantly higher rates of unemployment and financial insecurity, and their symptoms created greater interference with work and household activities compared to other COVID-19 status groups (all P < 0.05). After adjusting for demographics, past medical history and stressor covariates in multivariable logistic regression analysis, COVID-19 status was independently predictive of worse Neuro-QoL cognitive dysfunction scores (adjusted OR 11.52, 95% CI 1.01-2.28, P = 0.047), but there were no significant differences in quantitative measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, or sleep.Conclusion: Prolonged symptoms occurred in 25% of COVID-19 positive participants, and NeuroQoL cognitive dysfunction scores were significantly worse among COVID-19 positive subjects, even after accounting for demographic and stressor covariates. Fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep scores did not differ between COVID-19 positive and negative respondents.

KW - cognitive

KW - Community Dwellers

KW - COVID-19

KW - long-hauler

KW - post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection

KW - stressors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111914136&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnagi.2021.690383

DO - 10.3389/fnagi.2021.690383

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34349633

VL - 13

SP - 690383

JO - Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

SN - 1663-4365

M1 - 690383

ER -

ID: 67642475