Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Pregnancy loss. A 40-year nationwide assessment

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Breech and induction. Time for evidence-based informed consent

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

  2. Borderline ovarian tumors in Denmark 1997-2018: Time trends in incidence by histology, age and educational level

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Differentiated timing of induction for women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy - a historical cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Length of hospital stay after cesarean section in Denmark from 2004 to 2016: a national register-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Cancer in pregnancy increases the risk of venous thromboembolism: A nationwide cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Stress and depression among women and men who have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss: focusing on both sexes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Using Social Media for Qualitative Health Research in Danish Women of Reproductive Age: Online Focus Group Study on Facebook

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Chance of live birth: a nationwide, registry-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Introduction: Pregnancy loss is frequent. We aimed to assess the frequency and trends in pregnancy losses according to female age and mode of conception over a 40-year follow-up period. Material and methods: In a national historical prospective cohort study, we followed all Danish women 10-49 years over the 40-year study period 1978-2017. Data on pregnancies and their outcomes were obtained from the National Health Registry, the Medical Birth Registry and the National Fertility Registry. Incidence rates per 100 pregnancies and per 1,000 women-years as well as lifetime risks per 100 women were calculated. Women included in the lifetime analysis were followed from age 12 to age 49. Pregnancy loss included spontaneous abortion, missed abortion and anembryonic pregnancy. Results: In 3 519 455 recorded pregnancies, 337 008, or 9.6%, were diagnosed with a pregnancy loss. The proportion increased from 7.5% in 1978-1979, peaked at 10.7% in 2000 and thereafter decreased to 9.1% in 2015-2017. Pregnancy loss rate in women 10-14 years was 3.9%, increasing gradually with age to 26.9% in pregnant women 45-49 years, a 6.9-fold increase. Loss rates were slightly lower in naturally conceived pregnancies than in assisted pregnancies except for women above 45 years, where the risk of loss was higher in the spontaneously conceived group. Lifetime risk of specific numbers of losses were: 0: 76.9%, 1: 17.9%, 2: 3.9%, 3: 0.87%, and 4+: 0.35%. Conclusions: The proportion of women experiencing pregnancy loss has changed little throughout four decades and is still primarily influenced by female age. More than 75% of pregnant women are never recorded with a pregnancy loss, and <1.5% will experience three or more losses.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume99
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)1492-1496
Number of pages5
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

© 2020 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Research areas

  • anembryonic pregnancy, miscarriage, missed abortion, pregnancy loss, spontaneous abortion

ID: 59657096