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Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in behavioural flexibility and posttraumatic functional recovery: reversal learning and set-shifting in rats

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@article{28a4ebad22c54d5e8caa1b9ba0782bda,
title = "Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in behavioural flexibility and posttraumatic functional recovery: reversal learning and set-shifting in rats",
abstract = "Within one experiment and one T-maze, we examined the consequences of (i) bilateral lesions of the anteromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), (ii) bilateral transections of the fimbria-fornix (FF), or (iii) combined lesions of both PFC and FF (COMB) on rats' ability to perform reversal or set-shifting. Postoperatively, the animals were trained to perform a spatial discrimination go-right task. This was followed by (1) a spatial reversal go-left task (reversal learning), or (2) a visual pattern discrimination task (set-shift). Neither single (PFC or FF) lesion nor combined (COMB) lesions affected the animals' ability to acquire the original spatial discrimination task. Regarding the reversal learning, the performance of the PFC and the FF groups was not significantly different from that of the sham operated control animals (Sham). In contrast, animals with combined lesion of both structures were impaired on both error rate and acquisition speed relative to all other groups. Regarding the set-shifting, all lesioned groups were impaired relative to the Sham group both regarding the error rate and the acquisition speed. There was, however, no difference in the degree of impairment between the lesioned groups. We conclude that both the PFC and the hippocampus contributed to the mediation of the reversal learning and set-shifting. During functional recovery of reversal learning, these two structures exhibited a mutual dependency, whilst the functional recovery of set-shifting was mediated by a substrate outside these two structures.",
author = "Hana Mal{\'a} and Andersen, {Lykke Gr{\o}nbech} and Christensen, {Rie Friis} and Anita Felbinger and Julie Hagstr{\o}m and David Meder and Hadley Pearce and Jesper Mogensen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.brainresbull.2015.05.006",
language = "English",
volume = "116",
pages = "34--44",
journal = "Brain Research Bulletin",
issn = "0361-9230",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in behavioural flexibility and posttraumatic functional recovery

T2 - reversal learning and set-shifting in rats

AU - Malá, Hana

AU - Andersen, Lykke Grønbech

AU - Christensen, Rie Friis

AU - Felbinger, Anita

AU - Hagstrøm, Julie

AU - Meder, David

AU - Pearce, Hadley

AU - Mogensen, Jesper

N1 - Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Within one experiment and one T-maze, we examined the consequences of (i) bilateral lesions of the anteromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), (ii) bilateral transections of the fimbria-fornix (FF), or (iii) combined lesions of both PFC and FF (COMB) on rats' ability to perform reversal or set-shifting. Postoperatively, the animals were trained to perform a spatial discrimination go-right task. This was followed by (1) a spatial reversal go-left task (reversal learning), or (2) a visual pattern discrimination task (set-shift). Neither single (PFC or FF) lesion nor combined (COMB) lesions affected the animals' ability to acquire the original spatial discrimination task. Regarding the reversal learning, the performance of the PFC and the FF groups was not significantly different from that of the sham operated control animals (Sham). In contrast, animals with combined lesion of both structures were impaired on both error rate and acquisition speed relative to all other groups. Regarding the set-shifting, all lesioned groups were impaired relative to the Sham group both regarding the error rate and the acquisition speed. There was, however, no difference in the degree of impairment between the lesioned groups. We conclude that both the PFC and the hippocampus contributed to the mediation of the reversal learning and set-shifting. During functional recovery of reversal learning, these two structures exhibited a mutual dependency, whilst the functional recovery of set-shifting was mediated by a substrate outside these two structures.

AB - Within one experiment and one T-maze, we examined the consequences of (i) bilateral lesions of the anteromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), (ii) bilateral transections of the fimbria-fornix (FF), or (iii) combined lesions of both PFC and FF (COMB) on rats' ability to perform reversal or set-shifting. Postoperatively, the animals were trained to perform a spatial discrimination go-right task. This was followed by (1) a spatial reversal go-left task (reversal learning), or (2) a visual pattern discrimination task (set-shift). Neither single (PFC or FF) lesion nor combined (COMB) lesions affected the animals' ability to acquire the original spatial discrimination task. Regarding the reversal learning, the performance of the PFC and the FF groups was not significantly different from that of the sham operated control animals (Sham). In contrast, animals with combined lesion of both structures were impaired on both error rate and acquisition speed relative to all other groups. Regarding the set-shifting, all lesioned groups were impaired relative to the Sham group both regarding the error rate and the acquisition speed. There was, however, no difference in the degree of impairment between the lesioned groups. We conclude that both the PFC and the hippocampus contributed to the mediation of the reversal learning and set-shifting. During functional recovery of reversal learning, these two structures exhibited a mutual dependency, whilst the functional recovery of set-shifting was mediated by a substrate outside these two structures.

U2 - 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2015.05.006

DO - 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2015.05.006

M3 - Journal article

VL - 116

SP - 34

EP - 44

JO - Brain Research Bulletin

JF - Brain Research Bulletin

SN - 0361-9230

ER -

ID: 46005635