Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in behavioural flexibility and posttraumatic functional recovery: reversal learning and set-shifting in rats

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. The porcine corticospinal decussation: A combined neuronal tracing and tractography study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Epigenetic regulation of Arc and c-Fos in the hippocampus after acute electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Increased sensitivity to supra-threshold painful stimuli in patients with multiple functional somatic symptoms (MFS)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Measurements of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: methodological aspects and demographical data

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Locus coeruleus imaging as a biomarker for noradrenergic dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Emotionsregulering hos børn med Tourette syndrom

    Research output: Book/ReportPh.D. thesisResearch

  3. The role of dopamine in the brain - lessons learned from Parkinson's disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Sensorimotor subthalamic stimulation restores risk-reward trade-off in Parkinson's disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Within one experiment and one T-maze, we examined the consequences of (i) bilateral lesions of the anteromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), (ii) bilateral transections of the fimbria-fornix (FF), or (iii) combined lesions of both PFC and FF (COMB) on rats' ability to perform reversal or set-shifting. Postoperatively, the animals were trained to perform a spatial discrimination go-right task. This was followed by (1) a spatial reversal go-left task (reversal learning), or (2) a visual pattern discrimination task (set-shift). Neither single (PFC or FF) lesion nor combined (COMB) lesions affected the animals' ability to acquire the original spatial discrimination task. Regarding the reversal learning, the performance of the PFC and the FF groups was not significantly different from that of the sham operated control animals (Sham). In contrast, animals with combined lesion of both structures were impaired on both error rate and acquisition speed relative to all other groups. Regarding the set-shifting, all lesioned groups were impaired relative to the Sham group both regarding the error rate and the acquisition speed. There was, however, no difference in the degree of impairment between the lesioned groups. We conclude that both the PFC and the hippocampus contributed to the mediation of the reversal learning and set-shifting. During functional recovery of reversal learning, these two structures exhibited a mutual dependency, whilst the functional recovery of set-shifting was mediated by a substrate outside these two structures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume116
Pages (from-to)34-44
Number of pages11
ISSN0361-9230
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015

ID: 46005635