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Preferences for Self-Management and Support Services in Patients with Inflammatory Joint Disease - A Danish Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

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@article{33f717701af74b2f8bc6edf39cd61cfa,
title = "Preferences for Self-Management and Support Services in Patients with Inflammatory Joint Disease - A Danish Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To explore preferences for self-management and support services in patients with inflammatory joint disease (IJD) and to investigate whether these preferences differ by age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration.METHODS: We used a nationwide cross-sectional online survey for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and axial spondyloarthritis. Descriptive statistics were applied to explore preferences and to test for differences according to the different subgroups of patients.RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 664 patients. Younger patients indicated greater interest in 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, educational sessions, events, and online services, and older patients indicated greater interest in talks by researchers. More women than men indicated interest in health professionals' 1-to-1 discussions, occupational therapists' question-and-answer (Q and A) sessions, physical activity, and informational websites. Patients with axial spondyloarthritis tended to indicate the most interest in the different services, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis the least interest, reaching statistical significance regarding discussion groups about IJD experiences, 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, Q and A with another patient, stress/anger management, and online patient communication. More patients with short rather than long disease duration indicated interest in 1-to-1 discussions with rheumatologists or nurses, organized talks with experienced patients, and online services for patient communication and stories.CONCLUSION: Patients with IJD report various needs regarding self-management and support services, including 1-to-1 services traditionally delivered as part of usual care, but also talks, physical activity, and educational and online services. Although preferences differed across age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration, all subgroups indicated great need for support, with only small differences in their top preferences.",
author = "Hammer, {Nanna Maria} and Flurey, {Caroline A} and Jensen, {Kim Vilbaek} and Lena Andersen and Esbensen, {Bente Appel}",
note = "COPECARE",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1002/acr.24344",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "1479--1489",
journal = "Arthritis Care & Research",
issn = "2151-464X",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preferences for Self-Management and Support Services in Patients with Inflammatory Joint Disease - A Danish Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

AU - Hammer, Nanna Maria

AU - Flurey, Caroline A

AU - Jensen, Kim Vilbaek

AU - Andersen, Lena

AU - Esbensen, Bente Appel

N1 - COPECARE

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore preferences for self-management and support services in patients with inflammatory joint disease (IJD) and to investigate whether these preferences differ by age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration.METHODS: We used a nationwide cross-sectional online survey for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and axial spondyloarthritis. Descriptive statistics were applied to explore preferences and to test for differences according to the different subgroups of patients.RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 664 patients. Younger patients indicated greater interest in 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, educational sessions, events, and online services, and older patients indicated greater interest in talks by researchers. More women than men indicated interest in health professionals' 1-to-1 discussions, occupational therapists' question-and-answer (Q and A) sessions, physical activity, and informational websites. Patients with axial spondyloarthritis tended to indicate the most interest in the different services, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis the least interest, reaching statistical significance regarding discussion groups about IJD experiences, 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, Q and A with another patient, stress/anger management, and online patient communication. More patients with short rather than long disease duration indicated interest in 1-to-1 discussions with rheumatologists or nurses, organized talks with experienced patients, and online services for patient communication and stories.CONCLUSION: Patients with IJD report various needs regarding self-management and support services, including 1-to-1 services traditionally delivered as part of usual care, but also talks, physical activity, and educational and online services. Although preferences differed across age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration, all subgroups indicated great need for support, with only small differences in their top preferences.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To explore preferences for self-management and support services in patients with inflammatory joint disease (IJD) and to investigate whether these preferences differ by age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration.METHODS: We used a nationwide cross-sectional online survey for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and axial spondyloarthritis. Descriptive statistics were applied to explore preferences and to test for differences according to the different subgroups of patients.RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 664 patients. Younger patients indicated greater interest in 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, educational sessions, events, and online services, and older patients indicated greater interest in talks by researchers. More women than men indicated interest in health professionals' 1-to-1 discussions, occupational therapists' question-and-answer (Q and A) sessions, physical activity, and informational websites. Patients with axial spondyloarthritis tended to indicate the most interest in the different services, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis the least interest, reaching statistical significance regarding discussion groups about IJD experiences, 1-to-1 discussions with psychologists or another patient, Q and A with another patient, stress/anger management, and online patient communication. More patients with short rather than long disease duration indicated interest in 1-to-1 discussions with rheumatologists or nurses, organized talks with experienced patients, and online services for patient communication and stories.CONCLUSION: Patients with IJD report various needs regarding self-management and support services, including 1-to-1 services traditionally delivered as part of usual care, but also talks, physical activity, and educational and online services. Although preferences differed across age, sex, diagnosis, and disease duration, all subgroups indicated great need for support, with only small differences in their top preferences.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85087650599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/acr.24344

DO - 10.1002/acr.24344

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32475027

VL - 73

SP - 1479

EP - 1489

JO - Arthritis Care & Research

JF - Arthritis Care & Research

SN - 2151-464X

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 60177329